Education in New Zealand

newzealand

New Zealand has a reputation as a provider of quality education offering excellent study opportunities and support services in a safe learning environment. It is fast becoming a popular choice for international students seeking high quality education away from home.

Copyright: University of Canterbury. Education in New Zealand, International Students in New Zealand

Academic, profession and vocation studies are offered at universities, polytechnics, colleges of education, secondary schools and private training establishments. A number of English Language Institutes and private English Language Schools are also throughout the country.

New Zealand’s national education system is based on the British system. Research indicates New Zealand students are ranked amongst the top in the world academically.

All New Zealand’s international student education providers are required to be signatories to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students. The code is a document introduced in 2002 designed to ensure all signatories provide a high standard of pastoral care to meet the needs of international students studying in New Zealand. See the Ministry of Education Web site to view more information on the code.

English Language Schools

A number of English Language Institutes and private English Language Schools are located throughout the country.

International students in New Zealand are taught in an English speaking environment, where they are required to actively participate in class discussions and activities, with the aim to become fluent and comfortable with the use of everyday English.

View more information on education for international students in New Zealand.

High School/Secondary School

Copyright: Neil Macbeth. Rangi Ruru Girls School. Education in New Zealand, International Students in New Zealand

High school in New Zealand usually begins at 13 years of age beginning at the year nine level. Core subjects are offered during year nine and 10 – English or Maori, Science, Mathematics, Social Studies and Physical Education. Generally a couple of elective subjects are also taken.

To understand the schooling system in New Zealand, the Ministry of Education has published a guide to schooling which looks at what schools teach and how schools are run.

Students begin the National Certificate of Achievement (NCEA) in Year 11, working towards a qualification to gain entry into their tertiary institution of choice.

NCEA is a new national qualification for New Zealand secondary school students. Implemented throughout New Zealand schools in 2002, NCEA is the current path to tertiary education.

Many schools in New Zealand have been experiencing an increase in the number of students that come from a non English speaking background. These students help bring diversity to a school, and add awareness to a school learning environment.

University

New Zealand has a selection of 8 national universities with a great range of subjects in commerce, science and arts. Specialist subjects are offered at each university.

Most universities offer a foundation year programme to international students designed to provide the necessary preparation before beginning undergraduate study.

Copyright: Waikato Institute of Technology. Education in New Zealand, International Students in New Zealand

View more information on New Zealand’s universities:

  • Auckland University
  • Auckland University of Technology
  • Waikato Univeristy
  • Massey University
  • Victoria University
  • University of Canterbury
  • Lincoln University
  • Otago University

Polytechnics

New Zealand Polytechnics and Institutes of Technology give a more hands on approach to learning providing degrees, diplomas and certificate level qualifications.

View more information on New Zealand’s Polytechnics and Institutes of Technology:

Copyright: Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology. Education in New Zealand, International Students in New Zealand

  • The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
  • Universal College of Learning
  • Northland Polytechnic
  • Waiariki Institute of Technology
  • Manukau Institute of Technology
  • Tai Poutini Polytechnic
  • Tairawhiti Polytech
  • Bay of Plenty Polytechnic
  • Waikato Institute of Technology
  • Western Institute of Technology
  • Whitireia Community Polytechnic
  • Wellington Institute of Technology
  • Eastern Institute of Technology
  • Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology
  • Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology
  • Otago Polytechnic
  • Southern Institute of Technology

New Zealand is continually seeking to improve the quality of education and opportunities offered to international students studying here. Besides education, New Zealand offers a lifestyle second to none. So why not develop new skills while exploring new cultures and entertainment opportunities?

Please follow and like us:
0

The European Coaching Institute becomes International Institute of Coaching

europe

The European Coaching Institute, one of Europe’s leading accreditation organisations for coaches and coach-training providers, is proud to announce a change of name to the International Institute of Coaching.

The European Coaching Institute, one of Europe’s leading accreditation organisations for coaches and coach-training providers, is proud to announce a change of name to the International Institute of Coaching.

On announcing the organisation’s new name, at the official webinar launch Gerard O’Donovan, President, said “I am immensely proud to announce the Institute’s new name, which reflects the massive global expansion which has occurred in the last twelve months. For some time the Institute has been represented in countries far outside Europe and therefore it is appropriate that the name reflect this expansion. This new development is also in line with our Vision to be internationally recognized as the leading governing body in the coaching industry for ethical and responsible coaching and business practices”.

The launch recording and slide show can be viewed at the new style International Institute of Coaching web site

The International Institute of Coaching will continue with its core mission to accredit coach training schools and individual coaches world-wide to elevate the success of the coaching industry by being a role model organisation promoting values such as respect, compassion, inclusiveness and faith in humankind.

The Institute’s members are dedicated to using their coaching and leadership skills to contribute greatly to the creation of an enlightened world where individuals are more conscious by tapping into their real power. They will continue to work tirelessly to ensure all members feel safe at home within the IIC community and empower each other’s success by sharing their skills and knowledge.

Bonhag Consulting joins the Operations Team as the Management division of the IIC.

As a result of these exciting world wide developments, the Volunteer teams are expanding with many new member/volunteer roles being created. Anyone interested in becoming a volunteer should visit.

 

 

Please follow and like us:
0

8 reasons to Study in Europe

study in europe

What does studying in Europe offer you?

Did you know that over 1.4 million students from around the world came to Europe in 2012 for their higher education… and the numbers are growing every year. With 1000s of world-class universities, research centres and higher education institutions, Europe is the place to be.

Here are 8 good reasons to choose Europe for your higher education:

1. Careers: Shape your future

Want to get ahead in your career? In the QS 2011 Global Employer Survey

2. World-class education: Reach your full potential

World-leading universities, top facilities, inspirational teaching… in Europe, you’re at the centre of an international community with a passion for learning. What makes European universities so strong is the emphasis on creativity, innovation and support – helping you to reach your true potential.

3. Pioneering research: Be the best

Are you an ambitious researcher looking to boost your career? Europe offers you great opportunities. There were 1.58 million full time equivalent researchers in the EU-27 in 2009. Over the next decade, the European Union is actively looking to attract an additional 1 million researchers! Find out more about research jobs, funding and opportunities in Europe.

4. Support and friendship: Feel at home

Europe is a welcoming, friendly place for students from all around the world. Europe’s universities and colleges offer support and social activities to help you feel at home and happy. Europe is also a great place to live… 7 of the world’s 10 happiest countries

Studying in Europe is not just about lectures and libraries, it is also a once-in-a-lifetime chance to discover new countries… and to discover yourself too! From the snowy north to the sun-soaked south, across Europe you will find breath-takingly beautiful landscapes, buzzing cities and vibrant cultures waiting for you.

6. Scholarships and costs: Get value for money

European countries invest in their higher education systems to help make education affordable for students, whilst maintaining high quality standards. Across Europe, tuition fees and living costs compare very well to other study destinations… in fact, in some European countries, study programmes are free of charge! There are lots of scholarships and financial support options available too.

7. Diversity: Study the way you want

The beauty of Europe is that it offers so much choice. With world-class universities, higher education institutions and research institutes, offering 100,000s of Bachelor’s Degree, Master’s Degree and PhD/Doctoral programmes, plus short-term exchange programmes, you can choose the experience that suits you.

8. Languages: Learn in English or another leading global business language

There are 24 official languages in the European Union… but did you know that most countries across Europe offer study programmes in English too? You’ll also find programmes taught in other leading global business languages such as Spanish, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Arabic and more.

Watch our short film to discover more about studying in Europe:

Find out more

Please follow and like us:
0

Recent work visa changes in Australia

visa australia

GOOD NEWS! You can still apply for 457 sponsorship up until March 2018. After March, there will be a very similar visa called the Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) Visa.

In the past few months, the Australian Government announced a lot of different changes in its legislation regarding the working visas in general and the Working visa 457 in particular. In order to see clearer, Go Study gives you a summary of all the changes that will be effective from March 2018. Please be aware that some changes can still occur in the next months.

In this article, we will go through the changes regarding the main work visas and the English certifications.

Please be aware that some changes can still occur in the next months.

Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) visa

TSS – Medium Term

Quick summary

Max. duration: 4 years

Renewable: YES, onshore

Pathway to permanent residency: YES through ENS subclass 186 – Temporary Residence Transition stream (ENS186TRT)

Age limit: No limit

Employer-sponsored visa: YES

List of basic requirements and facts

  • Occupation must be listed on relevant skilled occupation lists for this subclass
  • Visa duration 2-4 years depending on occupation and contract
  • Business sponsorship approval valid for 1.5-5 years depending on type of business
  • No age limit for worker
  • Registered and lawfully operating business either established or start-up
  • Sufficient funds required for business expenses and employee salaries including foreign worker/s
  • Applicant must have appropriate skills and/or qualifications related to skilled occupation
  • Applicant must have an equivalent English IELTS score of 5 average with a minimum score of 4.5 in each component *an exemption may apply in some cases eg, if you are an eligible passport holder
  • Employer must pay market salary rate for full-time employment, 38 hours per week
  • Salary must not be less than $53,900 + 9.5 % superannuation, overtime additional
  • The employer must provide evidence of training expenses – 1-2% of total payroll for last 12 months or contribution to industry training fund depending on whether business employs Australian citizens or permanent residents. A training forecast may be accepted in some cases
  • The employer must provide evidence of genuine need in most cases – our office will provide examples including detailed guidelines and confirm whether this is required in your case
  • A business plan or organizational chart may be required in some cases
  • Advertising of the position is required in some cases – our office will confirm whether required in your case.
  • Additional information may be required depending on each particular case

TSS – Short Term

Quick summary

Max. duration: 2 years

Renewable: YES, just once

Pathway to permanent residency: YES through ENS subclass 186 – Direct Entry stream (ENS186DE)

Age limit: No limit

Employer-sponsored visa: YES

List of basic requirements and facts

  • Occupation must be listed on relevant skilled occupation lists for this subclass
  • Visa duration 2 years depending on occupation and contract
  • Business sponsorship approval valid for 1.5-5 years depending on type of business
  • No age limit for worker
  • Registered and lawfully operating business either established or start-up
  • Sufficient funds required for business expenses and employee salaries including foreign worker/s
  • Applicant must have appropriate skills and/or qualifications related to skilled occupation
  • Applicant must have an equivalent English IELTS score of 5 average with a minimum score of 4.5 in each component *an exemption may apply in some cases eg, if you are an eligible passport holder
  • Employer must pay market salary rate for full-time employment, 38 hours per week
  • Salary must not be less than $53,900 + 9.5 % superannuation, overtime additional
  • The employer must provide evidence of training expenses – 1-2% of total payroll for last 12 months or contribution to industry training fund depending on whether business employs Australian citizens or permanent residents. A training forecast may be accepted in some cases
  • The employer must provide evidence of genuine need in most cases – our office will provide examples including detailed guidelines and confirm whether this is required in your case
  • A business plan or organizational chart may be required in some cases
  • Advertising of the position is required in some cases – our office will confirm whether required in your case.
  • Additional information may be required depending on each particular case

Process to apply to TSS visa

 

  1. Standard Business Sponsorship (SBS) application
    Approval required for an employer to sponsor foreign workers. More than one worker can be sponsored. Sponsorship approval will be valid for 1.5-5 years depending on business.
  2. Nomination application
    Employer nomination required for the proposed worker (including family) and skilled occupation.
  3. Visa application
    Personal details of worker required including medical and character information. Worker requires appropriate qualifications and/or skills for nominated skilled occupation as well as relevant English score.

Total processing time: generally 3-6 months

Transition to Employer Sponsored Permanent residency available for specific skilled occupations and for those with at least 2-3 years of experience, other requirements also apply.

Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) visa – subclass 186

ENS subclass 186 – Temporary Residence Transition stream (ENS186TRT)

The Temporary Residence Transition stream is for subclass 457 visa holders who have worked for at least two out of the three years (before the nomination is made), while holding a subclass 457 visa, in the same occupation with their nominating employer (who is not subject to a labour agreement and who has lodged a valid nomination with us under the Temporary Residence Transition stream), who wants to offer them a permanent position in that occupation.

List of basic requirements and facts

  • Occupation must be listed on relevant skilled occupation list for this subclass
  • Applicant must have held 457 visa or TSS for 2-3 years in nominated occupation
  • Employer must have complied with 457 sponsorship obligations
  • Max age 50
  • Sufficient funds required for business expenses and employee salaries including foreign worker/s
  • Applicant must have appropriate skills and/or qualifications related to skilled occupation
  • Applicant must have an English IELTS score of at least 6 in each band
  • Employer must pay market salary rate for full time employment, 38 hours per week
  • Employer must provide evidence of training expenses – 1-2% of total payroll for last 12 months or contribution to industry training fund depending on whether business employs Australian citizens or permanent residents. A training forecast may be accepted in some cases
  • Additional information may be required depending on each particular case

For regional areas, the RSMS applies. See below

List of basic requirements and facts

  • Occupation must be listed on relevant skilled occupation list for this subclass
  • A 457 or TSS is not required for this option
  • Applicant must have appropriate skills and/or qualifications related to skilled occupation
  • Applicant must prove 3 years of work experience
  • Applicant must obtain positive skills assessment for skilled occupation
  • English IELTS score of 6 is required in each band
  • Max age 45
  • Applicant and employer must declare that employment will last for at least 2 years
  • The employer must pay market salary rate for full-time employment, 38 hours per week
  • The employer must provide evidence of training expenses – 1-2% of total payroll for last 12 months or contribution to industry training fund depending on whether business employs Australian citizens or permanent residents. A training forecast may be accepted in some cases
  • Additional information may be required depending on each particular case
Please follow and like us:
0

How I Prepared for My IELTS Language Exam

ielts exam

Hi, my name is Ioana and I am from Romania. I chose to take the IELTS examination as part of the benefits I received after finishing a six-month internship for the British Council, in my home country. I thought it would be a good opportunity to assess my English level and considered the certificate would be a huge plus for my CV as I was planning to work in a multicultural environment. I decided to take the IELTS because I thought it would best match my future interests. Eventually, I did benefit from my English certificate at my job interviews, and now I work as a content editor for an international company.

Registration and deciding on the exam type

Prepare for IELTS English certificate.jpg

As a past intern, British Council Romania took care of the whole registration process and my fees for the exam. All I had to do was fill in the application form and provide two recent passport-size photos.
The normal IELTS registration procedure begins with finding the nearest test centre, filling in the application form and sending it back by email or in person. You can find all the available 1000 test locations worldwide on the official IELTS website. In some centres, you can also register through the online registration system, but you have to talk with the staff from your centre about the payment methods.

It is important to consider carefully the test date that suits you best, taking into account the time you need for the exam preparation. In Bucharest, for example, the British Council offers IELTS tests twice per month, but there are other centres around the world that hold the exam even four times a month. Before registering, you will also need to decide which IELTS exam you want to take, depending on your personal goals, having to choose between the Academic and the General Training tests.

  • If you are interested in enrolling in a university from an English-speaking country or you want to attend an English-taught study programme, the IELTS Academic is better suited for you.
  • The IELTS General Training measures your level of English in everyday contexts and is more appropriate for visa applicants looking to immigrate and find a job in an English-speaking country.

Personally, I was looking to be able to work with my English skills at a more complex level, as a copywriter, editor or even a translator. I, therefore, chose the IELTS Academic, although I did not necessarily plan to study abroad. For the IELTS Academic, you will have more abstract, theoretical subjects, while IELTS General Training features a more applied set of questions and requirements. I think I made the right decision in taking the Academic because it helped me properly evaluate both my reading comprehension and my writing skills.

Preparing for the IELTS

Study for the IELTS English examination.jpg

There are a lot of ways to prepare for the exam, from library materials to a wide range of online resources. You can attend courses that train you for all sections of the IELTS examination, or you can practice on your own if you are a self-taught learner and want to save some money. On the British Council website, for instance, you have access to free resources such as the Road to IELTS test drive that will help you get a general idea about the examination. If you register for IELTS test via your local British Council, you can also get access to 30 more hours of free training.

I set my exam date in such a way that I would have two months available for preparation. To be quite honest, I didn’t work as much on preparation as I had initially planned, although my intention was not to acquire a more in-depth English knowledge, but only to familiarise myself with the IELTS examination. My history with learning English began with watching English cartoons, movies and music channels. Many shows only had Romanian subtitles, so the English words were easy to follow. I studied the language for another 10 years during school, and eventually English became the second language of instruction through my undergraduate and graduate studies. We would read most articles and books in English, and sometimes we had to write the essays and practical papers in English.

For my IELTS preparation, I had access to the audio and printed exam resources at the British Council library in Bucharest – another advantage of my internship. The materials proved very helpful, especially for the reading and listening training. With the writing section is more complicated, as it would probably be useful to ask someone with a better level of English to proofread your texts. However, the learning materials gave me a good idea about the possible subjects, as well as valuable writing tips. The internet is full of examples for the IELTS writing section, so it’s a good idea to spend some time researching them. Check out this example as well. As for the speaking section training, well, I just spoke English as much as I could during the internship, with my colleagues, my friends and doing online exercises.

Before the examination

There is nothing to fear when it comes to the actual examination, as the organising staff tries to make the atmosphere as relaxed and easy-going as possible, which is the standard procedure for international examinations. Your local IELTS centre will send you information well in advance about the location, date and hour of the examination, along with some general rules of conduct. I was only allowed to take inside the exam room my identity card, some pens and pencils and a bottle of water. Read some tips for the day of the IELTS exam.

My exam took place at a hotel in Bucharest, in their big conference room. We were asked to arrive at 8 AM, and we waited in alphabetical order to enter the examination room. The organisers took photos of us on the spot that were added to our language certificate. At 10 o’clock, everybody was ready to start the exam.

Taking the tests

Students taking IELTS English test.jpg

The first day of the examination, I took the listening, reading and writing sections of the exam. I was a bit stressed at the listening exam because I knew each audio was only played once and we did not have headphones. I only used headphones when I practiced at home, so I was not accustomed to hearing the audio samples in the room. However, the dialogues were accessible and I even took some short notes, after which I completed the questions, which I found fairly simple.

Instructions for the reading section are clear and easy to follow. I had some passages from an article about the demographics of a city, with questions requiring short answers, multiple choices or sentence completion. I tried to write as many answers as possible directly on the answer sheet and less on the draft because I did not want to run out of time.

Finally, the writing section had two parts and lasted one hour. The first task was to describe a bar graph, while the second was more demanding, involving some creativity and debating. Again, I tried to write as much as possible directly on the test paper, but only after making a coherent argumentation plan in my mind and on the draft. The bad part was that I finished writing at the last minute and I had no time to check my writing for errors.

At the end, I was scheduled for the speaking examination, which took place at the main British Council centre in Bucharest. There are typically three candidates in the room: one is examined while the others are drafting their answers and preparing for their turn. I passed my examination with a Romanian English teacher – a very relaxed and reassuring lady who told me I don’t need to be nervous, as we were just going to have a friendly discussion. She asked me what were my favourite subjects at the university and why, and about what places I would take a foreigner who wanted to visit Bucharest. The examiner records the whole exam and the speaking sample is sent to the IELTS administration for reviewing.

Receiving my final scores

I received my scores through email, within a couple of weeks, and I was very happy with the overall results. I got 7.0 out of a total possible 9.0. I gained more confidence in my English abilities, but I could also see objectively where I needed to improve my English. The writing tips I had learned during preparation proved very useful even after the examination.

The testing experience was not as stressful as I had expected. I think it was efficiently organised, or maybe it happened so fast that I did not have the time to feel the stress. The confidence boost I received by taking the IELTS helped me in finding a job where I could put my English skills to good use, as an English content writer for an international company in Bucharest.

I encourage others to take the IELTS as well as I was very happy with the professional staff and overall experience, which was challenging but fair. The resources and information provided by the British Council were also very helpful and I never felt I ran out of resources to practice my IELTS exam.

Please follow and like us:
0

IELTS Preparation: Understanding the task types

ielts preparation

There is clear evidence that learning the various task types in IELTS is the quickest and most effective way of improving your band score. We recently conducted research on over 100,000 British Council candidates using Road to IELTS (our official IELTS preparation product) to do just this. We found that after using the program for just six hours, candidates’ scores in the Reading module activities improved by, on average, 64%.

Clearly, in six hours there can be no significant change in their level of English; their improvement came from learning how to answer the questions. This can be achieved in a relatively short period of time.

How do I know if I understand the task types?

First, let me ask you some questions:

  • Do you really understand the difference between “Yes”, “No” and “Not Given” in the Reading test?
  • Do you know the kind of questions you should expect in Part 3 of the Speaking test? And do you know how to answer them to gain the maximum number of marks?
  • Do you know which tenses to use when you are describing a graph (Academic), or writing a letter (General Training)?

If the answer to any of these questions is “no”, then you are not yet properly prepared for your IELTS test.

What can I do?

If you do nothing else, you really must understand how the test works. This means becoming familiar with the question types and task types in each of the four skill tests. It will take the stress out of the experience. It will save you time in the test, and give you the best possible chance of achieving the band score you need.

And my advice to you? Start your preparation with Road to IELTS, which describes all the task types and gives you a lot of practice. If you register for IELTS with the British Council, you will get a Last Minute version free of charge. You should also consider subscribing to the full version here. It could make all the difference to your band score.

Please follow and like us:
0

German Higher Education Entrance Qualification

german in education

If you ever planned beginning your higher education studies in Germany, you must unquestionably be aware that holding the appropriate entitlement to qualify you to do so, is one of the key requirements for a successful application and studying in any German higher education institution. “Hochschulzugangsberechtigung” or the University Entrance Qualification, indicating the fact that the earlier education qualifies you to enter higher education studies in Germany, is the entitlement needed to possess when ready to apply for entering higher education studies in Germany. Despite the importance that this University Entrance Qualification has, anyhow, you must never ignore the fact that there are a number of other requirements of admission, you must put into consideration correspondingly when deciding to apply in any higher education in Germany.

High school graduates, following the end of their studies in a German school, in the country or abroad, receive an entitling certificate to enter higher education studies known as “Abitur”. The German Abitur is a qualification obtained at the upper Gymnasium level “Gymnasiale Obersufe” after 12 or 13 years of school education in a German school, authorizing the holder to study any subject at any higher education institution in Germany.

As Germany is one of the key attracting countries for many international students for pursuing higher education studies, the question is – what about those who did not have a German Abitur? Which is the way for their earlier education to be evaluated and to be harmonized with a German Abitur?

In such case, everyone who does not have a German Abitur, must necessarily have an entitlement that corresponds to the German Abitur level. In some cases, this entitlement can be a recognized foreign school-leaving certificate and sometimes a university entrance qualification examination. However, the rule is all-inclusive; everyone who wants to enter higher education studies in Germany must have a Higher Education Entrance Qualification.  As for those who do not possess a German Abitur but their education is recognized in Germany, in order for their application for admission to be considered complete, providing evidence about their earlier education being equivalent to the German Abitur is a compulsion.

Furthermore, every country has its own specific school-leaving certificates and so, not all of them can be equal to a German Abitur and some foreign school-leaving certificates are not recognized or partially recognized in Germany. In such case, a foundation course at “Studienkollegs” that leads to the University Entrance Qualification Examination is what an international – whose earlier education is not recognized in Germany needs, in order to make its earlier education recognized for entering higher education studies in Germany.

Categories of entitlements for entering higher education studies in Germany

Depending on the earlier education of the candidate, there are few categories of recognition or entitlements that qualify a candidate to apply for and enter higher education studies in Germany, as follows:

Direct entitlement

The candidate holding a direct entitlement is authorized to directly apply for the university admission and study in any higher education institution in Germany.

Indirect entitlement

Indirect entitlement is given  to the candidates whose earlier education does not directly qualify them to apply for the university admission. This category of candidates needs to enroll in a year preparatory course at Studienkolleg and must pass the University Entrance Qualification Exam. If successfully passing this exam, the candidate might have a direct or subject-specific university application.

General entitlement

A general entitlement holder enjoys the sufficient authority to apply for admission in any study subject in any chosen higher education institution in Germany.

Subject-specific entitlement

Holding a subject-specific entitlement the candidate can only apply and study in specific university study fields, as its earlier education received in home country, or exams it passed define subject areas that the candidate is proficient to study at.

There are five categories of subject areas recognized in Germany:

  • Technical and scientific subjects (T),
  • Social and Economic Sciences (W),
  • Medicine and Biology or related subjects (M),
  • Humanities and languages (G and S, at times combined as G/S).

How can I know if my secondary school leaving certificate is or is not sufficient

As previously mentioned, not all secondary school-leaving certificates are acknowledged in Germany, and as a result, not every person who possesses such certification – received by home country secondary schools, can be automatically considered an eligible candidate to apply for admission in a higher education institution in Germany. Accordingly, the country where the candidate has received a secondary school leaving certificate has a significant role as regards of foreign education recognition in Germany.

Candidates who received a school-leaving certificate from an institution in the European Union, Liechtenstein, Norway, Iceland or Switzerland, typically their certificates are automatically recognized in Germany.

As well, for candidates who finished their secondary education in one of 140 German schools abroad, their education will be automatically similarly recognized.

In any case, differentiating information about your school-leaving certificate being sufficient or not for entering higher education studies in Germany it is not that simple. And so, the best way for the candidate to answer to such important question, is by consulting very resourceful databases on the subject of foreign certificates recognition in Germany – the Anabin database and DAAD’s Database, and most importantly, the International Office of the University where you want to apply – being the final authority to decide on the recognition of your earlier education, as well as to offer additional guidance.

The DAAD Database

The  DAAD Database for Entrance Qualification is a resourceful database with information regarding foreign education certificates recognition in Germany. By selecting the country where you obtained your school-leaving certificate within the database, you might get a lot of specific information about the level of recognition of your education.

The Anabin Database

The Anabin Database is another very reliable free online tool/database for you and all foreign candidates who seeks to enter higher education studies in Germany – for understanding if German Education System recognizes your foreign education certificates and authorities.

This database, by possessing a country-specific searching options, allows you to get specific information about recognition of your earlier education certificate received in your home or other foreign country. Moreover, the database provides additional guidance about what are the further requirements for making your earlier education recognized in Germany. The Anabin database offers information that is exclusively in German language.

The International Office of the University

Despite the fact that Anabin and DAAD’s database are very practical and reliable channels of information about foreign education recognition in Germany, the International Office of the University is another important address where you can and must get the definite information from as respects of the question you have if your earlier education certificates are recognized or not for entering higher education studies in Germany.

Write an e-mail to the international office of the university where you want to pursue your studies at (typically contacts of such office are found in the contact section of the official university webpage), requiring the information concerning the recognition of your earlier education received abroad and further advices in case of insufficiency of your education.

The University will inform you if your education is recognized and the category of recognition and will guide about all the requirements needed to put consideration to make you an eligible candidate for admission in any higher education institution in Germany.

Keep in mind that is the university’s responsibility to conclusively decide regarding the candidate’s earlier education recognition.

If secondary school leaving certificate is not sufficient

Assuming your secondary school-leaving certificate does not fulfill the requirements for university admission in Germany, or is not equivalent to a German Abitur – there is no need to get disappointed, since there is a chance for you to get an alternative document, as a substitute of a German Abitur. This document can be taken after you successfully prove passing the University Qualification Assessment Exam, known as “Feststellungsprüfung”.

How to undergo the University Qualification Assessment Exam

The University Qualification Assessment Exam “Feststellungsprüfung” is a formal exam dedicated to all foreign candidates who seek to enter higher education studies in Germany, whose secondary school-leaving certificate is not equivalent to a German Abitur.

If successfully passing this exam, you are considered an eligible candidate to apply for admission into any German higher education institution, equal to other German Abitur holders.

This exam, as it is very demanding, typically requires a full participation of the candidate in lessons of the university preparatory / foundation course at the “Studienkolleg”, lasting two semesters – an academic year, offering subject-related knowledge. Also, there is a possibility for the candidate to prepare for the Assesement Exam on its own by registering as an external candidate, but a prior consultation with the university or Studienkolleg is highly recommended.

In case of failing the Assessment Exam at the first time, there is only one more that you are allowed to undergo the exam and  only after 6 months of the first exam, the earliest.

There are few elements that you and any foreign candidate must pay attention to, when seeking to undergo the Assessment Exam, as following:

Must enroll in a Foundation Course (Studienkolleg)

In order to undergo the Assessment Exam “Feststellungsprüfung” typically (not compulsory, but highly recommended) you need to be enrolled in a one year (2 semesters – an academic year) preparatory course / foundation course –“Studienkolleg”.

Studienkollegs can be found in few universities and colleges and there is no tuition fee applying to enroll in such course, however, there are symbolic semester fees that need to be covered by the candidate. The semester costs can vary, depending on the university semester rules and regulations.

There are different specialized Studienkollegs offered, such as:

  • M-coursededicated to medical, biological and pharmaceutical degrees,
  • T-course dedicated to mathematical, scientific or technical degrees,
  • W-course dedicated to business, economic and social science degrees,
  • G-coursededicated to humanities degrees or German studies,
  • S-coursededicated to language degrees.

Must undergo the Studienkolleg Entrance Exam (Aufnahmetest)

To become part of a foundation course at a Studienkolleg, the candidate must pass the Studienkolleg Entrance Exam or “Aufnahmetest” – in order to demonstrate possessing the needed German language proficiency and sufficient basic knowledge in the subjects in which the lessons of Studienkolleg will be offered.

There are two categories of Aufnahmetest, depending on the level of recognition of your school-leaving certificate, as well as on the field of study you are seeking to get admission at. Accordingly, if you are about to study technology, you will need to undergo T-Entrance Exam (for lessons in German, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Informatics, Technology, English and Technical Drawing), while if you are about to study business or social sciences you will need to undergo W-Entrance Exam (Lessons in German, Mathematics, Economics, Accounting, Informatics, Social Studies and English).

Each of the tests lasts 60 minutes and in case of failing the Studienkolleg Entrance Exam at the first try, there is a given opportunity for you to repeat it two more times.

See: Studienkolleg Entrance Exam sample

Must proof German language proficiency

To become part of a Studienkolleg, the candidate must proof possessing the needed German language proficiency – the upper Basic Level of the Goethe Institutes or B1 Level – according to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Learn more about the accepted forms to prove German language proficiency.

How to apply for a Studienkolleg

When deciding to apply for a Studienkolleg, you must firstly chose a Studienkolleg and check for the admission requirements and deadlines. Anyhow, some Studienkollegs require from the candidate to directly apply in their address, while some require to do the application through the online portal of the University Application Service for International Students in Germany, called the Uni-Assist.

An important thing to know when deciding to apply for a Studienkolleg is that you cannot start, by any occasion, a Studienkolleg without successfully passing the Studienkolleg Entrance Exam.  As well, keep in mind that Studinkollegs do not cover all the courses and are not offered by all universities.

Please follow and like us:
0

5 Ways Study Abroad Help Students To Grow In Their Career

student career

International education always provide an edge to students who want to be successful in their career. It opens so many doors on the professional front and prepare students to overcome the hardships of life. Here are 5 ways study abroad help students to grow in their career:

1) Study abroad looks good on resume:5 Ways Study Abroad Help Students To Grow In Their Career

Who doesn’t want a catchy resume! Students can use it as an advantage by putting the experience of international education. Firstly, it will make a deep impression on the employer. Moreover, you can share your experiences to start a good conversation.

2) It shows your willingness to adapt:

Study abroad shows that you are open minded and have the ability to adapt in other cultures easily. Potential employers demands employers who can adapt according to any situation which is a plus point as an experience of living abroad helps you in fulfilling this criteria.

Common Misconceptions Among Students On Studying Abroad

3) It’s a great way to highlight your language skills:5 Ways Study Abroad Help Students To Grow In Their Career

Language barrier is the one of the major things which international students overcome while studying abroad. It’s always better to know a second language which is an additional benefit for graduates. Firstly, it shows that you have adapted yourself according to the accents, slang and have enhanced your listening skills.

4) It makes you determined and independent:

5 Ways Study Abroad Help Students To Grow In Their Career

When we study abroad, we travel to another country, adapt to the new way of life, gain an understanding from international education and most importantly, we do everything by our own. This shows confidence, willpower and independence which are fantastic qualities employers look for. Moreover, if students are mature enough to study abroad then they are mature enough to enter the professional world.

5) Somehow, it makes a connection:

5 Ways Study Abroad Help Students To Grow In Their Career

Study abroad will certainly help you to bring experienced and successful people in your life. International Universities and Colleges are full of people who wants to succeed in their life and have the willingness to share their experiences with you. Surprisingly, you will meet a lot of people during internships or part time jobs which could help you to land a good job.

Ankush Verma
I mostly write on education related topics specially abroad education because of my too much interest in foreign universities and their teaching style. Besides a blog writer, I enjoy eating, hanging out with friends and night out parties.
Please follow and like us:
0

Advantages of Choosing the Right Course for Study Abroad

study in abroad

As your results are out, this question must be in your mind – should I choose to study abroad? This article may help you to decide whether you should go for it or not. Studying in foreign universities can help an individual to grow both personally and professionally. It can be one of the most interesting experiences of your entire life. Today, there are many study abroad opportunities in almost every country. Still worried why study overseas? Read on this article…!!!

Top-Quality Education

Today there are many programs that are specially designed for the students who plan to fly abroad. You will get chance to select from wide range of subjects and streams. You must choose a program that fits to your goals and interests.

Some of the most popular study abroad options available are Engineering, Business, Medical, Information Technology, Computers, Science and Technology etc. These courses are further divided into lots of sub categories from which you can choose any subject.

Foreign culture

With your study abroad experience, you will learn how to socialize in a better way as you will interact with the students of different culture and lifestyle from all around the globe. You have plenty of things to learn.

Better Employment Opportunities

The best part of studying abroad is a good fortune. Most of the universities offer career support services for the students during their study which means you will be employment ready after your course. Most courses include co-ops and industrial training where you get an easy exposure. This experience lets you find job easily, after completion of your studies.

This list will go on! Thus, choosing the right course for study abroad will give you better career opportunities on graduation, else it will be a waste of your hard-earned money and precious time.

For more help and guidance, you can visit the best Study Visa Consultant in your region.

abroad study consultants, best study visa consultants
Please follow and like us:
0

New Zealand Visas: Guide for Indian Students

study in newzealand

Find out what Indian students need to know when applying for a student visa for New Zealand.

New Zealand may not be the most well known of destinations, but it is highly regarded among international students for its high class education and desirable lifestyle.

Currently, New Zealand attracts as many as 90,000 international students every year. By 2025, the nation’s government intends to double this intake to 180,000.

What type of visa do I need?

If you need to stay for longer than three months in New Zealand for your educational program, you’ll need a Student Visa. International full-time (more than 20 hours a week of classes) students should apply to Immigration New Zealand (INZ) for a student visa.

It is worth noting that that certain criteria must be met before anybody can study in the country. To see if you qualify, check the INZ website.

How long will it take to process?

In August 2011 New Zealand restructured its visa application process, making it more efficient and student friendly. As well as improved standards of service, authorities now aim to deliver 80% of student visa applications within 30 days.

They aim to improve this to 90% within 25 days by August 2012.

How much does it cost?

A student visa will cost you US$185 (INR 8,463.29). The INZ, New Delhi, does not accept cash or credit cards – you will have to pay through a bank cheque or a draft.

Can I work while I study?

Full-time international students are permitted to work for a maximum of 20 hours in a week while they are studying. They can also work full time during holidays.

Foreign students who wish to work while they study must apply for a variation of the conditions of their student visa. This can be done either while filling out the initial application or later – as long as their student visa is valid.

Can I work after graduation?

To encourage international students to stay after completing their courses, the New Zealand government, allows those with no job offers in hand to get a visa for up to 12 months, and work at a temporary job while they search for job in their chosen field. The set of rules under which this is allowed is known as the Graduate Job Search Work Instructions.

Students who secure a job offer upon the successful completion of their degree need to apply for a Graduate Work Experience visa under the Study to Work Instructions. This allows them to work for two years in New Zealand, in order to gain some practical work experience relevant to their qualifications.

The Graduate Work Experience visa can be granted for three years in the case of eligible overseas students who intend to gain a membership or register with a New Zealand professional association which requires more than two years of relevant work experience to join. For more information, you can visit www.immigration.govt.nz.

What about immigration opportunities?

Candidates who meet all the requirements are eligible for a Work to Residence visa. The category of visa you will get will depend on whether your occupation is on the Long Term Skills Shortage List or not.

Bear in mind…

•    If you apply for a visa through an immigration adviser, be sure that they are licensed. The INZ may decline your visa application if it has been filed on your behalf by an adviser who is not licensed. Visit the Immigration Advisers Authority for more details.
•    New Zealand defines full-time students as those attending a private training establishment (PTE) for at least 20 hours each week; studying at least three papers, or the equivalent, each semester at a tertiary institution other than a PTE; or attending a primary, intermediate, or secondary school for at least one school term.
•    You can also apply for a student visa when you are already in New Zealand. A student visa granted onshore will usually include travel conditions allowing multiple journeys, so you can travel out of New Zealand and back in before the expiry of the visa.
•    Students Online is a service that makes applying for student visas easier, coming into being through an arrangement between Immigration New Zealand and selected education providers. If you are studying with an education provider that is part of Students Online, you can apply for your student visa at the international office on campus. For a list of education providers that are part of Students Online, see www.immigration.govt.nz/sol.
•    If you are aged 17 or under you may have to be accompanied by your parent or legal guardian.
•    Foreign students can also bring their car or household items to New Zealand without having to pay any customs duty. Visit www.customs.govt.nz for more details.

Useful contacts

Vatslya Education Consultancy
Office Address: 515-516, Poddar arcade, Nr. Railway Station, Varachha, Surat.
Contact no: +91 8980883388
Email: study.vatslya@gmail.com
Website: www.vatslya.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vatslyaedu/
Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxeZ6hnyjbUrmxP6c9TNTzw

Please follow and like us:
0