Educational policies and initiatives of the European Union

europe

In the European Union education is the responsibility of Member States; European Union institutions play a supporting role. According to Art. 165 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, the Community

The EU also funds educational, vocational and citizenship-building programmes which encourage EU citizens to take advantage of opportunities which the EU offers its citizens to live, study and work in other countries. The best known of these is the Erasmus programme, under which more than 3,000,000 students have taken part in inter-university exchange and mobility over the last 20 years. Since 2000, conscious of the importance of Education and Training for their economic and social objectives, EU Member States have begun working together to achieve specific goals in the field of Education. By sharing examples of good policy practice, by taking part in Peer Learning activities, by setting benchmarks and by tracking progress against key indicators, the 28 Member States aim to respond coherently to common challenges, whilst retaining their individual sovereignty in the field of Education policy. This strategy is referred to as the Education and Training 2020 programme (ET2020), which is an update of the Education and Training 2010 programme.[1] The European Union is also a partner in various inter-governmental projects, including the Bologna Process whose purpose is to create a European higher education area by harmonising academic degree structures and standards as well as academic quality assurance standards throughout EU Member States and in other European countries.

Contents

1Building a Europe of knowledge

  • 2Education and training policy
    • 2.1Target setting
    • 2.2Policy discussions
    • 2.3Networking
  • 3Education and training programmes
    • 3.1Inside the EU
    • 3.2Outside the EU
  • 4See also
  • 5References
  • 6Further reading
  • 7External links

Building a Europe of knowledge[edit]

The European Union adopted its first education programme (the COMETT programme, designed to stimulate contacts and exchanges between universities and industry) in July 1987. This programme was rapidly followed by the ERASMUS programme, which promoted inter-university contacts and cooperation, as well as substantial student mobility (as, in 1989, did the “Youth for Europe” programme, the EU’s first youth exchange support scheme). These programmes were adopted by the EU countries but with considerable support from the European Parliament which made budgets available even before the legal instruments had been adopted.

The European Union has two different types of instrument to increase the quality and openness of the education and training systems of the EU’s Member States: a set of policy instruments through which EU countries are encouraged to develop their own education systems and to learn from each other’s successes; and a substantial programme to support exchanges, networks and mutual learning between schools, universities or training centres as well as between the political authorities responsible for these areas in the different Member States.

Education and training policy[edit]

The European Union’s interest in Education policy (as opposed to Education programmes) developed after the Lisbon summit in March 2000, at which the EU’s Heads of State and Government asked the Education Ministers of the EU to reflect on the “concrete objectives” of education systems with a view to improving them.[2] The European Commission and the European Union’s Member States worked together on a report for the Spring 2001 European Council,[3] and in 2002 the Spring Summit approved their joint work programme [4]showing how they proposed to take the report’s recommendations forward. Since then they have published a series of “Joint Reports” every other year.[5][6][7][8][9]

The Commission seeks to encourage Member States to improve the quality of their education and training systems in two main ways: through a process of setting targets and publishing the position of Member States in achieving them and by stimulating debate on subjects of common interest. This is done using the process known as the Open Method of Coordination.

Target setting[edit]

As regards target setting, the Member States agreed in the Council on 5 May 2003 on five benchmarks on : early school leavers; number of graduates and decrease of gender imbalance in maths, science and technology; upper secondary education completion; low achievers in reading literacy; lifelong learning.[10]

Under the current policy framework in Education and Policy (ET2020), the seven benchmarks require that by 2020:[11]

1 – Early School Leavers : less than 10% of school pupils should leave school before the end of compulsory schooling

2 – Tertiary education attainment : at least 40% of the population aged 30–34 years should have completed tertiary education

3 – Early childhood education and care : 95% of children aged 4 to the age when primary education starts should participate in early education

4 – Low achievement in Reading, Maths and Science : no more than 15% of 15-year-olds should be low-achievers in reading, maths and science as measured at level 2 in the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment

5 – Employment rate of recent graduates : 82% of the population aged 20–34, who are no longer in education or training and have successfully completed upper secondary or tertiary education, should be employed

6 – Adult participation in life-long learning : participation of the 25-64 age group in lifelong learning (i.e. formal or non-formal continuing education or training including in-company skills development) should be not less than 15% per annum

7 – Mobility between countries : at least 20% of higher education graduates and 6% of 18- to 34-year-olds with an initial vocational qualification should have spent some time studying or training abroad

Since 2012,[9] progress against benchmarks and core indicators is yearly assessed in the Education and Training Monitor,[12] published every autumn by the Directorate-General for Education and Culture in replacement of the Progress Report.[9] The benchmark on Early school leavers and the benchmark on Tertiary education attainment are also Europe 2020targets.

Policy discussions[edit]

In addition to the measurement of progress, the Commission also publishes policy papers designed to encourage the EU’s Member States to look more closely at particular areas of their education and training policy. The Commission has published such papers over many years, but until the Lisbon Summit in March 2000, few were widely followed. Since then, however, Member States have become more open to mutual exchange and learning, and a number of Commission papers have had significant impact. A recent example (late 2006) may be found in the Communication on “Efficiency and equity in European education and training systems”. This paper was generally welcomed by Member States but it drew criticism from some (in particular Germany and Austria) who felt that it commented negatively on their education and training systems.[13]

Networking[edit]

Finally, the Commission has supported a variety of networking systems between Ministers (and Ministries) in the EU’s Member States, in addition to the thrice yearly meetings of the “Education Council” within the EU’s own institutional system. These range from biennial meetings of Ministers responsible for Vocational Education and Training (the “Copenhagen Process”), through regular meetings of Director Generals for Higher Education or for Vocational Education and Training to more specialised networks or “clusters” within the “Education and Training 2010 programme” in areas such as key competences, foreign language learning or the recognition of informal and non-formal qualifications.[14]

Education and training programmes[edit]

Inside the EU[edit]

The first European Union exchange programmes were the COMETT Programme for Industry-University links and exchanges, launched in 1987 (and discontinued in 1995); the Erasmus university exchange programme was launched in the same year. Similar programmes have been running ever since, and as from 2007 all the education and training programmes were brought together in one single programme; the Lifelong Learning Programme 2007-2013.[15] The Lifelong Learning programme comprises separate sub-programmes for schools; universities and higher education; vocational education and training; adult education; teaching about the EU in universities; and a ‘horizontal’ programme for policy development.

The schools exchange programme, named after the 15th century Czech teacher, scientist and educator John Amos Comenius, has helped over 2.5 million school students take part in joint projects across boundaries. The Erasmus programme (named after Desiderius Erasmus, the 16th century Dutch humanist and theologian), has been the icon of university exchange programmes since its launch in 1987. Some two million students have so far spent a fully accredited period of between 3 months and an academic year in another EU university under the programme, which has become a symbol of Europe in universities. The vocational education and training programme is named after the renaissance inventor and all-rounder Leonardo da Vinci. It currently helps around 75,000 young people each year to do an apprenticeship or internship in another EU country. The adult education programme, named after Pastor N. F. S. Grundtvig, the 19th century Danish theologian, poet, philosopher and thinker, helps those involved in adult education to have access to similar international experience. The sub-programme which supports teaching about Europe in higher education is named after the French politician and architect of European Unity, Jean Monnet.

The programme entered into force on 1 January 2007, and will continue until projects launched in its final year 2013 are closed – probably in 2016.

Outside the EU[edit]

The first EU programme to promote educational exchange and cooperation between educational institutions inside the EU and those outside it was the TEMPUS programme, adopted on 7 May 1990 by the Council as part of the assistance provided by the European Community of the day to the countries breaking free of Soviet rule.

The idea behind TEMPUS was that individual universities in the European Community could contribute to the process of rebuilding free and effective university systems in partner countries; and that a bottom-up process through partnerships with individual universities in these countries would provide a counterweight to the influence of the much less trusted Ministries, few of which had by then undergone serious change since Soviet domination. The programme was an immediate success; and by 1993 the number of participating countries had grown from five at the start to eleven. The programme was subsequently enlarged to include the Newly Independent States of the former Soviet Union; again to include the countries of the Western Balkans;[16] and finally to cover the Mediterranean countries.[17]

The TEMPUS programme[18] currently supports projects run by consortia of universities in the EU and in partner countries which aim to update curricula and teaching methods; to improve academic management (e.g., strategic development plans, systems of quality assessment and assurance); and to promote the higher education priorities of its partner countries. It also provides Individual Mobility Grants to enable individuals to travel to or from Europe in connection with these themes. The TEMPUS programme is still running, but will be renewed and revised as from 2007.

TEMPUS was followed by a series of smaller programmes built more round the mobility of academics towards the EU. These included the ALFA/ALBAN programmes with Latin American universities;[19] the Asia-Link programme;[20] and others, sometimes time-limited. A number of these appear to have been set up as a means of development assistancerather than with the development of universities as such, an impression strengthened by the fact that they were managed by the European Commission’s development assistance service EuropeAid rather than (like TEMPUS or Erasmus Mundus programme) by its Education and Culture department.

Finally, in 2003 the European Union launched the Erasmus Mundus programme, a project to ensure the place of European Universities as centres of excellence across the world; to attract the best students from around the world to Europe; and to enable partnerships between European universities and those in other countries. The programme had strong support both from the Council of Ministers and from the European Parliament.[21] The first phase of Erasmus Mundus will finish in 2008. The Commission has announced its intention to propose a further period. Europe Study Centre (ESC) has lately come up as a reputed and dependable company in Indian providing end to end services in the European overseas education field helping Indian students to avail the Erasmus Mundus benefits.

See also[edit]

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Education in New Zealand

newzealand

New Zealand has a reputation as a provider of quality education offering excellent study opportunities and support services in a safe learning environment. It is fast becoming a popular choice for international students seeking high quality education away from home.

Copyright: University of Canterbury. Education in New Zealand, International Students in New Zealand

Academic, profession and vocation studies are offered at universities, polytechnics, colleges of education, secondary schools and private training establishments. A number of English Language Institutes and private English Language Schools are also throughout the country.

New Zealand’s national education system is based on the British system. Research indicates New Zealand students are ranked amongst the top in the world academically.

All New Zealand’s international student education providers are required to be signatories to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students. The code is a document introduced in 2002 designed to ensure all signatories provide a high standard of pastoral care to meet the needs of international students studying in New Zealand. See the Ministry of Education Web site to view more information on the code.

English Language Schools

A number of English Language Institutes and private English Language Schools are located throughout the country.

International students in New Zealand are taught in an English speaking environment, where they are required to actively participate in class discussions and activities, with the aim to become fluent and comfortable with the use of everyday English.

View more information on education for international students in New Zealand.

High School/Secondary School

Copyright: Neil Macbeth. Rangi Ruru Girls School. Education in New Zealand, International Students in New Zealand

High school in New Zealand usually begins at 13 years of age beginning at the year nine level. Core subjects are offered during year nine and 10 – English or Maori, Science, Mathematics, Social Studies and Physical Education. Generally a couple of elective subjects are also taken.

To understand the schooling system in New Zealand, the Ministry of Education has published a guide to schooling which looks at what schools teach and how schools are run.

Students begin the National Certificate of Achievement (NCEA) in Year 11, working towards a qualification to gain entry into their tertiary institution of choice.

NCEA is a new national qualification for New Zealand secondary school students. Implemented throughout New Zealand schools in 2002, NCEA is the current path to tertiary education.

Many schools in New Zealand have been experiencing an increase in the number of students that come from a non English speaking background. These students help bring diversity to a school, and add awareness to a school learning environment.

University

New Zealand has a selection of 8 national universities with a great range of subjects in commerce, science and arts. Specialist subjects are offered at each university.

Most universities offer a foundation year programme to international students designed to provide the necessary preparation before beginning undergraduate study.

Copyright: Waikato Institute of Technology. Education in New Zealand, International Students in New Zealand

View more information on New Zealand’s universities:

  • Auckland University
  • Auckland University of Technology
  • Waikato Univeristy
  • Massey University
  • Victoria University
  • University of Canterbury
  • Lincoln University
  • Otago University

Polytechnics

New Zealand Polytechnics and Institutes of Technology give a more hands on approach to learning providing degrees, diplomas and certificate level qualifications.

View more information on New Zealand’s Polytechnics and Institutes of Technology:

Copyright: Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology. Education in New Zealand, International Students in New Zealand

  • The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
  • Universal College of Learning
  • Northland Polytechnic
  • Waiariki Institute of Technology
  • Manukau Institute of Technology
  • Tai Poutini Polytechnic
  • Tairawhiti Polytech
  • Bay of Plenty Polytechnic
  • Waikato Institute of Technology
  • Western Institute of Technology
  • Whitireia Community Polytechnic
  • Wellington Institute of Technology
  • Eastern Institute of Technology
  • Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology
  • Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology
  • Otago Polytechnic
  • Southern Institute of Technology

New Zealand is continually seeking to improve the quality of education and opportunities offered to international students studying here. Besides education, New Zealand offers a lifestyle second to none. So why not develop new skills while exploring new cultures and entertainment opportunities?

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Recent work visa changes in Australia

visa australia

GOOD NEWS! You can still apply for 457 sponsorship up until March 2018. After March, there will be a very similar visa called the Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) Visa.

In the past few months, the Australian Government announced a lot of different changes in its legislation regarding the working visas in general and the Working visa 457 in particular. In order to see clearer, Go Study gives you a summary of all the changes that will be effective from March 2018. Please be aware that some changes can still occur in the next months.

In this article, we will go through the changes regarding the main work visas and the English certifications.

Please be aware that some changes can still occur in the next months.

Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) visa

TSS – Medium Term

Quick summary

Max. duration: 4 years

Renewable: YES, onshore

Pathway to permanent residency: YES through ENS subclass 186 – Temporary Residence Transition stream (ENS186TRT)

Age limit: No limit

Employer-sponsored visa: YES

List of basic requirements and facts

  • Occupation must be listed on relevant skilled occupation lists for this subclass
  • Visa duration 2-4 years depending on occupation and contract
  • Business sponsorship approval valid for 1.5-5 years depending on type of business
  • No age limit for worker
  • Registered and lawfully operating business either established or start-up
  • Sufficient funds required for business expenses and employee salaries including foreign worker/s
  • Applicant must have appropriate skills and/or qualifications related to skilled occupation
  • Applicant must have an equivalent English IELTS score of 5 average with a minimum score of 4.5 in each component *an exemption may apply in some cases eg, if you are an eligible passport holder
  • Employer must pay market salary rate for full-time employment, 38 hours per week
  • Salary must not be less than $53,900 + 9.5 % superannuation, overtime additional
  • The employer must provide evidence of training expenses – 1-2% of total payroll for last 12 months or contribution to industry training fund depending on whether business employs Australian citizens or permanent residents. A training forecast may be accepted in some cases
  • The employer must provide evidence of genuine need in most cases – our office will provide examples including detailed guidelines and confirm whether this is required in your case
  • A business plan or organizational chart may be required in some cases
  • Advertising of the position is required in some cases – our office will confirm whether required in your case.
  • Additional information may be required depending on each particular case

TSS – Short Term

Quick summary

Max. duration: 2 years

Renewable: YES, just once

Pathway to permanent residency: YES through ENS subclass 186 – Direct Entry stream (ENS186DE)

Age limit: No limit

Employer-sponsored visa: YES

List of basic requirements and facts

  • Occupation must be listed on relevant skilled occupation lists for this subclass
  • Visa duration 2 years depending on occupation and contract
  • Business sponsorship approval valid for 1.5-5 years depending on type of business
  • No age limit for worker
  • Registered and lawfully operating business either established or start-up
  • Sufficient funds required for business expenses and employee salaries including foreign worker/s
  • Applicant must have appropriate skills and/or qualifications related to skilled occupation
  • Applicant must have an equivalent English IELTS score of 5 average with a minimum score of 4.5 in each component *an exemption may apply in some cases eg, if you are an eligible passport holder
  • Employer must pay market salary rate for full-time employment, 38 hours per week
  • Salary must not be less than $53,900 + 9.5 % superannuation, overtime additional
  • The employer must provide evidence of training expenses – 1-2% of total payroll for last 12 months or contribution to industry training fund depending on whether business employs Australian citizens or permanent residents. A training forecast may be accepted in some cases
  • The employer must provide evidence of genuine need in most cases – our office will provide examples including detailed guidelines and confirm whether this is required in your case
  • A business plan or organizational chart may be required in some cases
  • Advertising of the position is required in some cases – our office will confirm whether required in your case.
  • Additional information may be required depending on each particular case

Process to apply to TSS visa

 

  1. Standard Business Sponsorship (SBS) application
    Approval required for an employer to sponsor foreign workers. More than one worker can be sponsored. Sponsorship approval will be valid for 1.5-5 years depending on business.
  2. Nomination application
    Employer nomination required for the proposed worker (including family) and skilled occupation.
  3. Visa application
    Personal details of worker required including medical and character information. Worker requires appropriate qualifications and/or skills for nominated skilled occupation as well as relevant English score.

Total processing time: generally 3-6 months

Transition to Employer Sponsored Permanent residency available for specific skilled occupations and for those with at least 2-3 years of experience, other requirements also apply.

Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) visa – subclass 186

ENS subclass 186 – Temporary Residence Transition stream (ENS186TRT)

The Temporary Residence Transition stream is for subclass 457 visa holders who have worked for at least two out of the three years (before the nomination is made), while holding a subclass 457 visa, in the same occupation with their nominating employer (who is not subject to a labour agreement and who has lodged a valid nomination with us under the Temporary Residence Transition stream), who wants to offer them a permanent position in that occupation.

List of basic requirements and facts

  • Occupation must be listed on relevant skilled occupation list for this subclass
  • Applicant must have held 457 visa or TSS for 2-3 years in nominated occupation
  • Employer must have complied with 457 sponsorship obligations
  • Max age 50
  • Sufficient funds required for business expenses and employee salaries including foreign worker/s
  • Applicant must have appropriate skills and/or qualifications related to skilled occupation
  • Applicant must have an English IELTS score of at least 6 in each band
  • Employer must pay market salary rate for full time employment, 38 hours per week
  • Employer must provide evidence of training expenses – 1-2% of total payroll for last 12 months or contribution to industry training fund depending on whether business employs Australian citizens or permanent residents. A training forecast may be accepted in some cases
  • Additional information may be required depending on each particular case

For regional areas, the RSMS applies. See below

List of basic requirements and facts

  • Occupation must be listed on relevant skilled occupation list for this subclass
  • A 457 or TSS is not required for this option
  • Applicant must have appropriate skills and/or qualifications related to skilled occupation
  • Applicant must prove 3 years of work experience
  • Applicant must obtain positive skills assessment for skilled occupation
  • English IELTS score of 6 is required in each band
  • Max age 45
  • Applicant and employer must declare that employment will last for at least 2 years
  • The employer must pay market salary rate for full-time employment, 38 hours per week
  • The employer must provide evidence of training expenses – 1-2% of total payroll for last 12 months or contribution to industry training fund depending on whether business employs Australian citizens or permanent residents. A training forecast may be accepted in some cases
  • Additional information may be required depending on each particular case
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Top 50 student accommodation halls in the UK

student in uk

Deciding where to live at university? Check out this rundown of the top 50 student halls in the UK, as reviewed by students

 Making the right choice of where to live at university could make the difference between making life long friends or having your cheese stolen from the fridge. 

Although you cannot be sure which of the above you’ll end up with before you move in, there are other factors to take into account when choosing your university accommodation such as value, location, and sociability.

To help with this, StudentCrowd analysed 10,834 reviews by students and graduates of the halls that they lived in while at university.

The breakdown of the overall score of each of the halls was based on the following criteria (unfortunately number of cheese thieves isn’t one of them – but these are still helpful guidance points):

  • Value for money
  • Location
  • Management
  • Cleanliness
  • Social Space/ Communal Areas
  • Social Activity/ Events
  • WiFi

Students were asked to rate their halls between one to five stars for each of these criteria.

All of the universities in the top 10 are located in the Midlands, north of England and Scotland, with only a handful of universities in London and the south featuring in the top 50 as a whole. Universities in the south that do feature include the University of Reading, the University of Exeter and the University of Bath.

Best university halls in the UK

Ranking Halls/Accommodation University
1 Falkner Eggington Loughborough University
2 St Regulus Hall University of St Andrews
3 Nightingale Hall University of Nottingham
4 Josephine Butler College Durham University
5 McIntosh Hall University of St Andrews
6 John Burnet Hall University of St Andrews
7 Grizedale College Lancaster University
8 Harry French Hall Loughborough University
9 Stephenson Hall University of Sheffield
10 Park Terrace Newcastle University
11 Langwith College University of York
12 University College Durham University
13 St Salvator’s Hall University of St Andrews
14 John Snow College Durham University
15 Stephenson College Durham University
16 James College University of York
17 St Pancras Way University College London
18 Trevelyan College Durham University
19 William Murdoch Aston University
20 St Christopher’s Court University of Derby
21 Wessex Hall University of Reading
22 Holland Hall University of Exeter
23 Chancellors Court Edge Hill University
24 William Morris Loughborough University
25 Furness College Lancaster University
26 Liberty Cambrian Point Cardiff University
27 Yarncliffe Apartments University of Sheffield
28 Derwent College University of York
29 The Quads University of Bath
30 Norfolk Terrace University of East Anglia
31 Telford Loughborough University
32 Lafrowda University of Exeter
33 Cripps Hall University of Nottingham
34 County College Lancaster University
35 Rootes University of Warwick
36 Froggatt Apartments University of Sheffield
37 Hatfield College Durham University
38 New Bridge Street Northumbria University
39 Park Court University of Lincoln
40 Gowar Halls Royal Holloway, University of London
41 Denmark Road University of Manchester
42 Queen’s Road Student Village University of Winchester
43 Royce Loughborough University
44 Fylde College Lancaster University
45 Norwood House University of Bath
46 The Meadows University of Essex
47 Van Mildert College Durham University
48 Bluebell University of Warwick
49 Fferm Penglais Aberystwyth University
50 Keynes College University of Kent
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Interested in Education in New Zealand?

education

New Zealand attracts students from all over the world for a number of reasons. For most, New Zealand is a somewhat exotic destination due to its far flung location. It is also a country with a unique culture and a stunning natural environment with endless possibilities within adventure and sports. Last but not least, education in New Zealand is of a very high quality and well accepted all over the world. Take a look at the information below to learn more about education in New Zealand.

New Zealand – The Facts & Figures

Capital

Wellington

Language

English, Maori, NZ Sign Language

Population

4,786,280

Area Size

268,021 km²

Students

172,000 (26,000 international)

Academic Year

March – October

Currency

New Zealand Dollar ($)

Calling Code

+64

Time Zone

NZST (UTC+12)

What you need to know about New Zealand

New Zealand is an island nation in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country is compose by two main landmasses—the North Island and the South Island— and around 600 smaller islands.

Studying in New Zealand is an adventurous experience in a country with  magnificent landscapes and coastline that encompass distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal and plant life. Get ready to immerse yourself in the outdoors and delight in activities that make the most of the spectacular scenarios that will surround you.

Before you give a step forward and start your education in this high developed country, there’re few things you need to know. This guide will help you through the process of pursuing a high education degree in New Zealand.

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US Immigration

usa immgration

United States of America has an established history of welcoming immigrants from all over the world. There are different categories of US immigration based on Family Immigration of US citizen and Green Card holder, Business Immigration, and Investor Immigration.

Family Immigration

United States of America has an established history of welcoming immigrants from all over the world. There are different categories of US immigration based on Family Immigration of US citizen and Green Card holder, Business Immigration, and Investor Immigration

Business Immigration

This category includes owners, executives and employees of the foreign companies outside of the USA to work and live in the USA temporarily. This category is for L-1 visa.Principal applicant can bring his/her dependents to the USA. After three years under this category visa    holders can apply for the green card (Permanent Residence).

 Investor Immigration

This category includes E-2 Visa and EB-5. The difference between E-2 is applicant has to make substantial investment, there is no minimum and maximum limit if investment has been provided in the law but we recommend it should not be less than $50,000. Under E-2 category applicant can not apply for the green card, this visa is valid as long as your investment in the US will be active. E-2 visa holder can bring his/her dependents to live, study and work in the USA. In this category in one investment two families may be entertained on the equally half/half basis. Children under 21 years of the age are eligible to come with their parents in E-2 category.

EB-5 category is requires to make an investment of $500,000 minimum to qualify. These investments are made through the Designated Regional Centers of US Immigration. In this category EB-5 visa holder with his family (Children under 21) get the green card within a month of his arrival in the USA.

Investments made in E-2 and EB-5 are secured in your ESCROW ACCOUNT. Feel Free to contact us for more information. We provide the best services for filing petition with the US Immigration Department and consular processing with US Embassy Islamabad and US Consulate in Karachi.

Our Free USA Immigration Eligibility Assessment is designed to instantly determine if you are eligible to apply for the US Immigration.

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Study & Work Visa for Italy

stydy in italy

Work & Student Visa in Italy

Student visas in Italy are issued by Italian Embassies and consular posts in a student’s country of origin or permanent residence.

European Union (EU) students can enter Italy with a valid passport or an ID card and are entitled to complete a degree in Italy without a visa for as long as they wish. These students must, however, register with the Questura (police station), to obtain residence permit.

Non-EU students are required to obtain a student visa prior entering Italy.

Visa types

There are two types of student visas in Italy, depending on the duration of the study program.

  • Visa type C: Short-stay visa or travel visa valid for one or more entries and for a period not exceeding 90 days
  • Visa type D: Long-stay visa valid for more than 90 days

Always start these procedures well in advance of the intended date of entry as the process time can be lengthy. The procedures for student visas in Italy are subject to change, so it is worthwhile to contact the Italian Embassy for information to confirm current visa requirements.

Required Documents

Application forms for student visas in Italy must include a recent passport-size photo, a valid travel document and supporting documents depending on the type of visa the student is applying for.

Students also have to present the following:

  • Letter of acceptance from the university
  • Proof of adequate financial means of support, including the amount necessary to travel back to their home country or have already purchased a valid return-ticket
  • Health documents
  • Accommodation

Working during your studies

Non-EU students may work during their studies if they obtain a work permit. Processing times vary between regions and it takes an average of two months. Therefore it’s better if students don’t rely on getting a job upon their arrival to Italy.

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How to travel 20+ countries VISA-FREE with US visa

free-visa

Yes, you read it correct. Travel 20+ countries VISA-FREE with US visa.

I always encourage travelers from developing countries to get a US visa at some point. It opens up doors to many other countries. More and more countries have started offering visa exemption with a valid US visa. This list is only growing.

You can start off your international travel adventure with VISA-FREE countries first. But getting a US visa will add another 20+ countries to that list.

Why do countries offer visa exemption to US visa holders?

Reason 1: Strict screening
US visa application has a very strict screening process. US visa is also one of the most difficult visas to get. If you have a US visa, then you were screened pretty well already. Meaning, you do not have a criminal history or any illegal immigration intentions.

Reason 2: Strong ties to your home country
US visa application also makes sure you have strong ties to your home country. This is to avoid illegal immigration. If you were to stay illegally anywhere, you could have stayed illegally in the US itself. So, having a US visa reassures them that you have no intentions of remaining in their country illegally.

Reason 3: Financial reasons
Developing countries do not have the infrastructure or the money to screen the applicants. If you were already screened by a country like the USA, there is no need to screen you again. In order to have a screening process that is as foolproof as the US, it costs a good chunk of money.

Which US visas are eligible?

USA visa image
The US visa can be a tourist visa (B1/B2), work visa (L1/L2/H1/H4) or permanent residency (Green card). Some countries allow C/D type of visas as well. Some countries require the US visa to be multiple-entry and has been used at least once to travel to the US.

So, without further due, here is the list.

North America

Chichen Itza in Mexico

1. United States

(of course!)

2. Mexico

Central America

Jaco beach in Costa Rica

3. Guatemala

  • Applies to India passport holders only
  • Entry up to 30 days
  • More info: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Guatemala and Embassy of India in Guatemala

4. Honduras

  • Applies to India passport holders only
  • Entry up to 30 days

5. El Salvador

  • Applies to India passport holders only
  • Entry up to 30 days
  • More info: Ministry of Foreign Relations of El Salvador

6. Nicaragua

  • Applies to India passport holders only
  • Entry up to 30 days
  • More info: Email response from the consulate of Nicaragua in Washington DC – “Si tiene visa vigente de USA valida y pasaporte más de seis meses, puede viajar y el Pasaje ida y vuelta y dirección en Nicaragua. La visa al entrar a Nicaragua se la darán por un mes, el cual si quiere estar más tiempo tiene que solicitar a la Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería.”

7. Costa Rica

  • Applies to all nationalities
  • For B1/B2, C1 or D visa from the USA, it must be valid for at least 1 day from the day of arrival
  • For student/work visa or PR from the USA, it must be valid for at least 6 months from the day of arrival
  • Entry up to 30 days
  • More info: Embassy of Costa Rica in Canada and Embassy of Costa Rica in Washington DC, USA

8. Panama

  • Applies to all nationalities
  • US visa must be valid for at least one year from the date of arrival
  • US visa must have been used at least once to enter the US before
  • Entry up to 30 days
  • More info: Embassy of Panama in the USA

Caribbean

Dominican Republic

9. Dominican Republic

South America

Plaza Bolivar in Bogota, Colombia

10. Colombia

  • Applies to Cambodia, China, India, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam passport holders only
  • Entry up to 90 days
  • More info: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Colombia

11. Peru

  • Applies to India and China passport holders only
  • The US visa must have been granted for at least 6 months
  • Entry up to 180 days
  • More info: Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Peru

Europe

Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey

12. Turkey

  • Applies to the following passport holders only
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but are eligible to apply for 30 day eVisa
  • More info: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Turkey

13. Georgia

  • Applies to all nationalities
  • Entry up to 90 days
  • More info: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Georgia

14. Albania

  • Applies to all nationalities
  • Must have used the visa/PR to enter USA at least once
  • Entry up to 90 days
  • More info: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania

15. Montenegro

  • Applies to all nationalities
  • Entry up to 30 days
  • More info: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Montenegro

16. Serbia

  • Applies to all nationalities
  • Entry up to 90 days
  • More info: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Serbia

Middle East

Dubai skyline in UAE

17. United Arab Emirates

  • Applies to only India passport holders
  • Visa in NOT EXEMPT, but are eligible to avail Visa ON ARRIVAL at UAE airports including Dubai
  • Entry up to 14 days
  • More info: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of UAE and NDTV News

18. Qatar

  • Applies to all nationalities
  • Visa is NOT EXEMPT, but are eligible to apply for eTA and then avail Visa ON ARRIVAL at international airports in Qatar
  • Entry up to 30 days
  • More info: Qatar Tourist Authority and Ministry of Foreign Interior, Qatar

Asia

Boracay Island in Philippines

19. Taiwan

  • Applies to CambodiaIndia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, Philippines and Vietnam passport holders only
  • Visa is EXEMPT but must apply online for Republic of China Travel Authorization Certificate (Valid for 90 days) before arrival
  • Entry up to 30 days
  • More info: Bureau of Consular Affairs, Republic of China (Taiwan)

20. Philippines

  • Applies to only India and China passport holders
  • Entry up to 14 days for India passport holders
  • Entry up to 7 days for China passport holders
  • A 7 day extension is possible
  • More info: Embassy of Philippines in Singapore

21. South Korea

  • Applies to all nationalities except Cuba, Macedonia, Syria, Sudan and Iran
  • Must be in transit to reach the US as final destination
  • Entry up to 30 days
  • More info: Republic of Korea Visa Portal

22. Singapore

  • Applies to India passport holder only
  • Must be in transit to or from the US
  • Entry up to 96 hours
  • More info: Singapore Immigration & Checkpoints Authority

There you have it! List of 20+ countries you can travel visa-free with US visa. If you don’t have a US visa already, it’s time to apply for one and add another 20+ to your list of VISA-FREE countries.

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Why are so many Indian students coming to New Zealand?

newzealand has simplified

The international student market is huge money-maker for our economy. It’s already New Zealand’s fifth largest export category worth close to $3 billion and it’s only getting more lucrative. Last year, the money from tuition fees alone topped $1 billion for the first time.

While most of the international students in New Zealand have traditionally been from China, over the last few years, Indian students have rapidly grown in number. There are now more Indian students in the non-university tertiary sector than any other group.

There were more than 29,000 Indian students enrolled to study here in 2015; that’s a 150 percent increase since 2010.

More students mean more money pumped into our economy andTertiary Education Minister, Steven Joyce, says benefits of international education extend well beyond their economic contribution.“Young New Zealanders live and learn alongside people from other countries, increasing their understanding of other cultures and boosting our links with the world. These links are vital for us to prosper in an increasingly Asia-Pacific world,” he says.

The bad news is, it’s not exactly going to plan. Over the last few years, more and more accounts of cheating, immigration fraud, shoddy agents, exploitation of workers and low-quality education providers have emerged. However, much of it happens behind the scenes or even before the students land on New Zealand soil.

Earlier this year, The Wireless travelled to India to find out what’s behind the rapid growth. Here’s what we know:

#1: A very bad decision

The reality is, New Zealand isn’t a first choice study destination for most Indian Students. Countries like the US, UK, Canada and Australia are usually on the top of their wish list. But when the New Zealand Qualification Authority (NZQA) decided to change the rules, the country experienced an unprecedented surge in Indian students wanting to study here – what started as a wave quickly became a tsunami.

It began in 2013 when NZQA, with the approval of Tertiary Education Minister Steven Joyce, drastically altered the English language requirements for Indian students.In a nutshell, some Private Training Establishments (PTEs) could enrol students into their programmes without having to prove they could speak English through the standard channels – they could use their own tests and criteria instead.

PTEs are privately owned tertiary education providers. They are registered by NZQA and must be signatories of a special code to enrol international students.

While in India, The Wireless spoke to Navneet Singh, co-founder of GoGlobal education consultancy, in the North of the country.

Co-founder of GoGlobal, Navneet Singh

Photo: Julian Vares/The Wireless

Navneet sends hundreds of students to New Zealand every year and says while the intent of the policy change wasn’t bad, the results had hugely negative impacts for New Zealand.

“Before anybody could understand what happened, it went haywire.

“The primary responsibility [for English testing] was given to the PTEs…and who made the biggest money? The PTEs.”

The rule change led to a sharp increase in fraudulent activity, both by those in India and PTEs in New Zealand looking to make cash off easy-to-exploit entry requirements.

The number of international students from India surged from about 12,000 to more than 20,000 between 2013 and 2014.

Tweet from 2014 advertising study without English testing

Then the surge became a flood.  At the end of October last year, Immigration NZ already received 11 percent more student visa applications than in the whole of 2014, most of which were being declined.

In a high priority report to the Steven Joyce released to under the Official Information Act, NZQA stated that some education agents in India were actively promoting New Zealand as a destination for its ease of entry. It also noted that, in some cases, these agents in India where given the authority to enrol students on the PTEs behalf.

“These [education] providers appear to have no visibility or control over how many offers of place are issues, or to whom. Some of this “outsourcing” is of poor quality.”

Licensed Immigration Adviser Munish Sekhri says he saw, first-hand, what was going on.

“I personally was approached by many PTEs who said ‘hey look, we’ll give you the login details for our English testing portal so you or your staff can sit [the test] on behalf of the students and we’ll offer an admission letter instantly.”

Indian students also suffered. Many with low language skills become susceptible to exploitation in the New Zealand workforce, with some only managing to get jobs paying as little as $4 an hour.

Noticing the damage, NZQA tried to back-track.

They re-introduced rules in late 2015 which meant education providers couldn’t use their own English assessments for students coming from India but many say the damage was already done.

#2: Rogue Agents

The majority of students coming from India are from the North – a region most Kiwis will recognise through their taste buds with dishes like tandoori chicken, korma and naan.

Walking along the streets of Chandigarh in North India, the number of signs and banners advertising education abroad is staggering. They line the shop fronts with promises of “easy visas”, “instant approval”, and “residency”, vying for the attention of potential students.

Photo: Julian Vares/The Wireless

Most young Indians organise their trips through education agents. These agents give advice on where to study, help organise visa applications, and facilitate English testing. However, there are few rules and regulations that govern who can be an agent, what they can say, or how much they can get paid.

Late last year, a Facebook group was set up to support students in New Zealand – Agents Trapped International Students – which has 330 members. One member wrote: “I was told that business program has lot of demand and great jobs are available in Auckland. I have done graduation in business hence I thought it will be great decision to go ahead. But when I landed here I saw every third person doing this degree.”

Agents giving misinformation to potential students, as well charging high fees and falsifying documents is a growing problem.


LISTEN: Insight looks into the growing issue of dodgy visa applications from India.


Immigration lawyer Alistair McClymont says agents also tell students it’s easy to get jobs in New Zealand – a big draw card for those wanting to get residency after their study.

“If you look at any of the marketing that the agents do in India, it’s not about the quality of the qualification; it’s about the benefits that a student will get if they complete a New Zealand qualification. And that’s not in terms of the skills they get…it’s about what Immigration NZ will offer them after they graduate.”

Agents are paid commission to send students to particular education providers. Universities give a flat rate of about 10 percent commission, while Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics give up to 30. Reports out of India suggest agents are offered up to 50 percent commission to send students to PTEs, making them more appealing to send students to, even if the quality of education is low.

Out of the 29,235 Indian students in New Zealand last year, more than 21,000 of them attended PTEs. Navneet from GoGlobal in India says shoddy agents can say anything to attract students.

“There are ads in newspapers which say ‘go through us, we’ll give you free air ticket, we’ll give you a laptop.’ When such lucrative ads are there, you can understand what is happening.”

Chandigarh, North India

Photo: Julian Vares/The Wireless

Recently the NZ Herald reported that out of the 10,863 declined applications Immigration received from Indian in ten months, 85 percent had been lodged by unlicensed education advisers, student agents and lawyers who are exempt from licensing.

Regulating agents in India is no simple task. While there are about 33 licensed immigration advisors in India, according to Munish Shekhri, there are thousands of others working with students and getting commission from New Zealand companies. But he says the blame can’t solely to put on the agents or even the places offering them commission – the students need to take responsibility, too.

“The big onus is on the student…they have to understand they cannot come to New Zealand and corrupt the country.”

#3: Cheap as chips

Te Puke – a quiet town outside of Tauranga with a population of about 8,000 – is best known for its kiwifruit. It backpackers and camping grounds are full of seasonal workers from the Pacific Islands, plus the odd travellers hoping to make some cash picking in the orchards.

Te Puke is also the home of Royal Business College, self-described as one of the “largest and most respected colleges in New Zealand”.

With four campuses across New Zealand, its Te Puke campus was the most intriguing. The Wireless headed there last month and found there wasn’t much to see.

The Royal Business College campus is located in an industrial block, with a train track a couple hundred metres from its front door. The outside is unassuming with a couple broken chairs and narrow door.

Royal Business College, Te Puke

Photo: Mava Enoka

At lunch time, a stream of young Indian boys came out of the building. Surprisingly, there are no other ethnicities and very few women. Some get into their cars and drive to the local McDonalds while others hang around the parking lot. One student says he was paying $12,000 for a business course in Wellington but moved to Te Puke when he was offered his second year for just $7,000. He said it was a cheaper place to live and easier to find a job.

All the students we spoke to worked on Kiwifruit orchards.

While the website says the campus “provides the ideal learning environment for our Diploma courses in Horticulture,” staff at Royal Business College say they are currently only offering business courses in Te Puke. They wouldn’t let us inside but encouraged us to call the owner, Jimmy Royal. He did not return our requests to talk.

Chairs outside Royal Business College, Te Puke

Photo: Mava Moayyed

The attraction of PTEs is clear: At universities, international students can expect to pay about three times more than domestic students. In India Renjith Narayan, 21, forked out $72,000 for an 18 month masters course at the University of Auckland. It’s no surprise, then, that many hunt for cheaper alternatives.

In New Zealand, PTEs offer courses in almost everything. A course can cost a smidgen of the price of a university degree. There are over 500 PTEs in New Zealand but only about 250 of them are licensed to enrol international students and most of them in central Auckland.

At lunch time, Queen Street starts to resemble the malls in India. Hundreds of young Indians, mostly boys, gather in groups outside their PTEs dressed in distinctly western fashion. Many order fast food and drag on cigarettes. According to information released under the Official Information Act, about 50 education providers have a visa decline rate over 30 percent. This includes popular PTEs like National Technology InstituteRoyal Business, and Newton College of Business & Technology.

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