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study in poland

First of all, you need to graduate from a school, which enables you to pursue further education at an academic level . Secondly, you need to legalize your stay in Poland for the period of your studies. Thirdly, you need to look after your health and safety. Finally, depending on the language you wish to study in, you need to submit a certificate confirming your knowledge at a proficient level, be it English or Polish.[…]

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WORK VISA TO POLAND. HOW MUCH DOES IT COST IN INDIA?

You look for a job. The list of websites with job offers from the Work in Poland category page  should make it easier.
You find an employer and tell him that he needs to apply for a work permit for you. He should know how to do that. If not, tell him to contact me.
Your employer gets a work permit for you. Unfortunately, the process may take a long time. Even up to 3 months in the most difficult cases. Anyway, when it’s over, he sends you one of three official copies.
As you’re from India, you go to the official website for visa applications.
You apply for a visa for work (max. 1 year). For the consular post in New Delhi, the visa processing fee for all types of visas equals 4 400 INR.
You start thinking about residence and work permit application as soon as possible. This is really important. Polish bureaucracy can be really slow, and you cannot apply for a temporary residence permit after your visa expiration date.[…]

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The 10 Most Beautiful Towns in Poland

In the heart of Kraków’s Old Town, the Gothic church spires loom overhead, above a patchwork of baroque frontispieces and romanesque buildings. Nearby, the winding Vistula river snakes past the bars and bohemian cafés of Podgórze district, the elegant outline of the great Wawel Castle glowing in gold and ochre and red brick atop the craggy Wawel Hill. Elsewhere, cobblestone alleys give way to smoky jazz joints and bubbling squares loaded with local trinket markets hidden in Kazimierz. No wonder upwards of seven million visitors hit this one every year.[…]

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Education in Malta

You can find free, state-run kindergartens for three- to five-year-old children in most communities. Over 90% of all Maltese children in that age range do attend kindergarten. However, only 3,578 children received formal childcare in 2016 and many attend church schools instead. Since nearly everybody in Malta is bilingual (90% can speak English), the language barrier will not be much of a problem as long as your kid has some basic English skills.[…]