MSc Programs in Sports Coaching 2018 in Paris in France

coaching in paris

Master programs provides the same title for the degree – the Master. Postgraduate studies such as Masters of Science are shortened MSc. The Master of Science in Management program or the Master of Science of Management education are postgraduate programs in common management. This means that students receive an academic education with depth of reflection and abstraction. Masters usually can be classified as Master of Science (MSc) or the popular Master of Arts (MA). The Master of Science (MSc) usually is given for successfully achieving postgraduate programs with a science or technical point of convergence.

Sports coaches use a variety of methods to maximize the potential of the players they lead. The discipline of sports coaching is built upon multiple knowledge bases, including game strategy, exercise physiology and sports psychology.

France is currently among the 20 best performing countries in terms of the economy due to their excellent results-oriented higher education learning. Most of the courses at universities are offered in the French language. France has 60 public and 100 private universities.

Main teaching fields and research fields

  • Education and motricity
  • Adapted physical activities and health
  • Sport management
  • Coaching and motor performance
  • Psychological perspectives
  • Social organization of sport
  • Motor control and perception
  • Risk, Intervention, Movement, and Balance
  • Sport, politics and social transformations

Through this Master of Education program, students will explore a range of principles and techniques related to sports coaching situations. This program will teach students how to:

  • Apply professional and academic knowledge in developing and implementing effective learning experiences in the field of sports coaching
  • Examine the technological resources available to support the implementation of specific strategies in coaching athletes and teams
  • Develop an integrated model with the right mix of training activities, coaching pedagogy and sports science to optimise athletic performance.

Graduates will understand the processes involved in talent identification, recruitment and development. They will also be confident in maintaining, assessing and amending planning processes on a macro and micro scale.

World class, specialised Master’s programmes for new and recent graduates

Our MSc programmes will equip you with the knowledge and skills needed to pursue your ambitions and are an excellent investment in your future. With access to our world-class faculty and their cutting-edge research, you will find that studying with us opens doors across the world.

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Best Student City in the World – Paris

study in paris

Paris has many destinations youngsters prefer to explore. It stands tall in the forefront of education too. It may not be the ideal location for youngsters on a budget, but it is an outstanding city in student related matters.

paris

The British Education Company Quacquarelli Symonds published a study in which Paris holds 412 points, 15 points ahead of Melbourne and London. It has placed this beautiful city in top spot for previous two decades. The other top ranking cities are Sydney, Hong Kong, Boston and Tokyo 388,386,386,386,386 points respectively. The parameters used by Quacquarelli Symonds are university rankings, student diversity, qualify of life, recruiters’ reputation and last but not the least being access to finance.

A Paris University chancellor was of the opinion that the quality of their teaching and the research facilities won Parisian University’s international appeal. A study revealed in 2017 that Paris has 17 world leading universities, London is just ahead by one university. Though the places to live here are expensive, the tuition fees is relatively cheaper and hence it makes it an affordable place compared to other countries.

Students Graduating from Paris universities are exposed to a broad range of avenues since the students enjoy the many facilities like leading academics, small class sizes and intensive teaching by expert faculties. A staggering number of international students in 2017 cemented there place as a hot spot for education as well as entertainment.

Vatslya, an overseas education consultancy situated in Surat for reaching out to students who are interested to continue their higher education in international places such as Germany, France, Denmark, Sweden etc. We help students to get exposed to various domains of education.

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Things to know before moving to Sweden as a student

study in sweden

What should I know before moving to Sweden as a student?

Today lot of students after completing their Graduation degree have a very big dream of doing Masters in Sweden or completing their Master’s Degree from a top recognized college from abroad. In this scenario, it is very important for the students, apart from searching for the good colleges and universities, is to do a thorough research about the country’s geographical landscapes, climatic conditions, population, languages, culture, cost of living, education system, job prospects and a lot of other factors. So it is very important for a student to know about all the information from the overseas education consultants whom they refer to the country that he or she is going to build their career. Although there are good European countries like Germany, France, and others which provide excellent colleges for Masters Education but one European country which most of the students prefer today is to study in Sweden.

Geographical Landscape:

Sweden is the third largest European country in terms of area wise, which is spread across at 450295 square kilometers. The capital city of Sweden is Stockholm, which is also one of the main centers of learning. Apart from it, some of the other beautiful cities that are good resources for students willing to study in Sweden are Gothenburg, Lund, Uppsala, Umea.

Climatic Conditions:

Since Sweden is situated quite near to the north of equator it provides a moderate climate. Although the summer remains moderately hot but the winter is chiller. If you are a coastal lover then definitely you are going to love it because of it wind factor. So don’t forget to pack your warm clothes before flying to Sweden.  

Population and Culture:

As per the data provided by Wikipedia, the current population of Sweden is 10.0 million as on 31 March 2017. In terms of culture, cities like Stockholm, Gothenburg remain very active and drive lots of attention due to big restaurants to dine and enjoy, museums to know the rich heritage and lively concerts to enjoy. Smaller cities also provide a lively atmosphere where you can meet with the local people and community thereby making new Swedes friends. Languages: Basically Swedish is the major language spoken mostly by the vast local community, but English too is widely outspoken by a huge mass. Also a very good thing to know is that out of other European counterparts the Swedes speak the best English. It is very much essential to have a basic knowledge of the Swedish language as it will help you to interact with the local community. Knowing of the Swedish language is not a mandatory option when you think of the study in Sweden requirements, but still, there are some universities like Uppsala which offer free courses to teach Swedish languages to foreign students.

Cost of living:

For a student planning to study Masters in Sweden, it is very important to save their money very carefully. Although the tuition fees are free, but relatively all other things are a bit costly when you go out to purchase from the local grocery shop.

Accommodation:

Searching for an accommodation is a kind of challenge when it comes to study in Sweden requirements. If you are looking forward to study Masters in Sweden, finding an accommodation depends on 2 ways.

While most of the universities provide accommodation or likewise the universities help you to get an accommodation or the other way is to find your own accommodation in nearby town & cities which is more risky and costly. If your options are Stockholm or Uppsala, then you have to hold your nerves because there’s already a scarcity there as a lot of foreign students are still in the queue. But do not worry since you will have the sub-let options which means you can share the bed, flat or house with other fellow students. So speaking frankly, this accommodation problem is not really a very big problem.

Education:        

In terms of higher education, Sweden is one of the finest destinations in Europe.

Sweden hosts some of the top universities like Stockholm University, Lund University, Chalmers University and many more which provides excellent knowledge for students preferring to study Masters in Sweden.

GoogleImages Sweden hosts some of the top universities like Stockholm University, Lund University, Chalmers University and many more which provides excellent knowledge for students preferring to study Masters in Sweden.

Sweden hosts some of the top universities like Stockholm University, Lund University, Chalmers University and many more which provides excellent knowledge for students preferring to study Masters in Sweden.

Job Prospects/ Internship Programs:

A foreign student who wants to study in Sweden or to pursue Masters in Sweden from any Sweden universities have the freedom of working part time after their studies. Also, there are some universities that help students to find suitable part-time jobs. Sweden is a place where one can find lots of international companies which provide an excellent opportunity for students to either start their career or lookout out of internship programs.

Medical Facility:

If you are a foreign student and willing to study Masters in Sweden then it is an important factor to register with the Swedish Tax Agency where after the student is provided with a personal identification number which allows the student to be eligible for all medical expenses. Also, students can approach the universities to know if they provide any other medical facilities.

Admission and Visa Process:

Last but not the least is about the admission and visa processing. There is a lot of overseas education consultant which helps students to study in Sweden. These consultants also give students all the detailed information regarding study in Sweden requirements. Also, these consultants help students in the selection of good colleges while helping them with all the visa and documentation processing. So if you are planning or facing any doubt regarding to study in Sweden, then please visit Vatslya – one of the best overseas education consultant in surat. or also you can visit our website http://vatslya.com for all queries and enquiry.

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Choose the Perfect European Country for Your 2018 Study Adventure

study in europe

All of you who ponder on the idea of studying abroad should definitely consider a country from Europe, even if you’re a European yourself. Why? Because Europe is one of the oldest continents, each country is quite unique, stepped in history, and there is always something new and interesting to discover, regardless of the study destination you will choose.

In addition, if you will study in Europe, you will inevitably learn a new language, uncover the secrets of a new and different culture and what’s probably most exciting than anything, visit some of the world’s most appealing and iconic attractions.

In terms of the educational benefits, many countries from Europe are home to some of the top-ranked universities worldwide, students benefit from a highly supportive and multicultural academic environment, you can find a plethora of English-taught programmes and in some cases, you don’t even have to pay tuition fees.

12 popular countries where you can study in Europe

Except for UK universities, known to offer only English degrees, along with the increasing number of international students worldwide, many other European universities deliver study programmes that are either partially or entirely conducted in English. The good news is that each year, more universities from many European countries introduce English-taught courses.

Check out this list including some of the most popular countries and cities from Europe where you can enjoy your international study adventure:

1. Study abroad in Germany

Whether you want to study in Berlin, Munich, Koln, Frankfurt, or in any other German city, you are guaranteed to receive a high standard education combined with world-class research. German universities are well-known for their academic performance, modern student facilities and graduates’ high employability rate. Germany has some of the highest ranked universities worldwide in terms of excellent teaching as well as student satisfaction.

In addition, an important factor that adds to the popularity of Germany among international students is the fact that no public university charges tuition fees.

Check out student life in:

  • Berlin
  • Munich
  • Koln
  • Frankfurt

2. Study abroad in the Netherlands

Netherlands is one of the European countries that is truly committed to welcome a large number of international students. In the Netherlands, you will find more English-taught degrees than study programmes conducted in Dutch and many universities use the same grading system as American colleges and universities.

Higher education in Netherlands is based on innovation, creativity and study degrees integrate a curriculum that is 100 % adapted to the current events, issues and discoveries in the field; so whatever you study, you are bound to receive a proper training that will make you an expert in your chosen field. Many of the Dutch universities hold high positions in international rankings.

Some of the most popular university cities in the Netherlands are:

  • Amsterdam
  • Maastricht
  • Delft

Find out more about living costs in the Netherlands.

3. Study abroad in Austria

If you want to live and study in one of the safest countries in the world, take advantage of low or even no tuition fees, embrace a unique mix of German, Italian and Hungarian cultures, then Austria is your answer. In Austria, your study experience at some of the best universities in the world will be enriched by the overall high class and elegant environment.

Whether it’s Vienna, Salzburg or other city in Austria, you will be surrounded by exquisite architecture, embrace the typical coffee culture and can even attend one of the famous dance balls. In Austria, you can pursue a degree in music, especially in Vienna – nicknamed the music capital of the world, psychology, since Freud laid the foundations of psychoanalysis here, business and more.

4. Study abroad in Spain

study in spain

Spain is known for its friendly environment, warm climate, affordable living expenses and tuition fees. Although many students who choose to come to Spain are highly interested in acquiring Spanish language, you will find numerous Bachelor, Master and even PhD degrees that use English as medium of instruction.

The largest number of international students can be found in big cities like

  • Madrid
  • Barcelona
  • Marbella

You can study social sciences, journalism, hospitality and of course, business, as Spain is home to some of the most distinguished and renowned business schools.

5. Study abroad in Italy

One of the most popular European destinations, Italy welcomes thousands of foreign students and tourists alike any time of the year. If you’re interested in arts, architecture or world history – some of the most searched study fields in this country, Italy would definitely be the ideal spot for you.

There are so many reasons to choose Italy to pursue your degree abroad, such as excellent teaching, fantastic cuisine, low living costs and the numerous and remarkable attractions.

Check out some of the most thriving student cities in Italy:

  • Roma
  • Milano
  • Bologna
  • Florence.

6. Study abroad in Scandinavian countries

Universities from Scandinavian countries – Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland are some of the most prestigious worldwide, known for their study programmes that focus on problem-based learning and state-of-the-art research work.

Study in Denmark and you will love finding yourself lost among more bicycles than people, choose Norway and you can combine studying with plenty of interesting outdoor activities, or go to Sweden and experience teachers’ friendly approach.

Regardless of which of these countries you will select, you will enjoy a vibrant multicultural environment, study for free and even get to see the amazing Northern lights.

Apart from the fact that you can study in English, in all of these countries you can easily communicate with anyone by simply addressing in English.

Check out how you can apply to a university in Finland, Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

Get more details about what it’s like to study in:

  • Copenhagen
  • Stockholm
  • Helsinki
  • Oslo
  • Uppsala
  • Goteborg

7. Study abroad in Poland

study in poland

Poland is a top European country in terms of the literacy rate of the population, the number of people enrolled in higher educational institutions exceeds 1,5 million.

Polish universities hold a long tradition and reputation in terms of quality education and particularly medicine, engineering, architecture and information technology graduates are highly appreciated by employers worldwide.

Anywhere you’ll go in Poland, you can easily live on a low budget. In Poland, you will embrace a fascinating culture, blending a medieval, fairy tale like atmosphere with a bustling city life.

Popular Polish student cities are Krakow and Warsaw.

8. Study abroad in Portugal

Similar to Spain, Portugal covers a lively, friendly and laid-back atmosphere, enough reasons for many internationals to come study here. Additionally, Portugal is home to some of the oldest universities in the world, particularly hunted by students who prepare for a career in social sciences, journalism, law and even medicine. Lisbon and Porto count for the largest number of international students.

See how you can apply for an undergraduate or graduate degree in Portugal.

Take advantage of low fees and costs, listen to fado, and delight your taste buds with some of the best wines and delicious cuisine in the world.

9. Study abroad in Switzerland

Switzerland is not just the land of the finest chocolate, luxury watches and home to some of the highest mountain peaks in Europe. Swiss universities are incredibly career-focused and due to Switzerland’s reputation in groundbreaking research, the country manages to always attract numerous talented scientists.

Bern and Zurich are the most popular student cities.

Applying for a degree in Switzerland is quite easy, but you will have to carefully manage your monthly living costs.

10. Study abroad in France

The typical cliché about studying abroad in France is living “la vie en rose” or experiencing a truly Bohemian lifestyle. While that may be true, France is still home to several worldwide famous universities, present in international rankings.

French business schools are also greatly acclaimed for their exceptional teaching style and unique features and if you’re interested in specializing in fashion, you should give French institutes and universities a serious thought.

Apply for a degree in Paris, Bordeaux, Marseille or anywhere in France, prepare to become an expert in your study field and visit some of the greatest and outstanding museums in Europe.

11. Study abroad in Belgium

study abroad

Located in the centre of Europe and home to the United Nations headquarter, Belgium covers for a high multicultural environment. Although French, German and Dutch are equally acknowledged official languages, many Belgium universities still offer English-taught programmes. So it is no wonder that Belgium counts for a significant number of foreign students, over 100,000 annually.

Belgium cities that cover a large part of the international student population are:

  • Brussels
  • Gent
  • Liege

Check out more reasons why you should consider studying abroad in Belgium and have a look at the average tuition and prices.

12. Study abroad in Ireland

Ireland is one of the obvious choices when it comes to study destinations in Europe that provide English programmes. Ireland is known as one of the countries with the friendliest locals, and universities are truly focused on helping foreign students adjust easier as they integrate many student services and student organisations.

Recently, Ireland has announced clear intentions to enlarge the number of foreign students attending its universities. EU students who apply to undergraduate degrees in Ireland are exempt from paying tuition fees and some of the most popular degrees are information technology, business, and life sciences.

Find out more about student life in

  • Dublin
  • Cork
  • Galway

Widen your study perspectives from Europe

The list may continue as there are many other countries in Europe where you can have a both intellectually and culturally enriching study experience. You can also take into account Slovenia, Estonia, the Czech Republic, Greece, Romania and other. Just search thoroughly and take note of all the advantages and disadvantages you will have to deal with in a certain country. Choosing the perfect university is very important, as well as overall tuition and student living costs, but don’t forget to take other factors into consideration.

So start browsing, take notes and see how the search will guide you through selecting the best place in Europe where you can begin an exciting chapter of your life.

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WORKING IN POLAND

WORK WHILE STUDYING

You can help pay for your education by working part-time while you’re studying.
International students have the right to work while studying in Poland as long as they are enrolled in an Institution. Students who are not nationals of EU member countries must also hold a valid residency permit. The right to work applies to all students, including those who are in Poland for the first time, those who are enrolled in the first year of a university program, and those who are enrolled full-time in a language school.
20hrs work permitted during studies as well as 3 months of full time work during holidays.
Full time work is permitted for Residence Card holders.

 

WORK AFTER GRADUATION

Students from member countries of the European Union may work in Poland without restriction after they graduate. It may be really hard to leave such a beautiful country after you complete your education here. Don’t worry if you prefer to stay and work in Poland. As a graduate of a Polish higher education institution full-time program, you don’t need a permit to work here. Just make sure your stay permit is in order. You can stay back for further 2-3 years as long as you can prove that you can financially support yourself without seeking any government benefits. Students who obtain a job or accept employment can obtain a Work Permit.

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New Zealand Visas: Guide for Indian Students

study in newzealand

Find out what Indian students need to know when applying for a student visa for New Zealand.

New Zealand may not be the most well known of destinations, but it is highly regarded among international students for its high class education and desirable lifestyle.

Currently, New Zealand attracts as many as 90,000 international students every year. By 2025, the nation’s government intends to double this intake to 180,000.

What type of visa do I need?

If you need to stay for longer than three months in New Zealand for your educational program, you’ll need a Student Visa. International full-time (more than 20 hours a week of classes) students should apply to Immigration New Zealand (INZ) for a student visa.

It is worth noting that that certain criteria must be met before anybody can study in the country. To see if you qualify, check the INZ website.

How long will it take to process?

In August 2011 New Zealand restructured its visa application process, making it more efficient and student friendly. As well as improved standards of service, authorities now aim to deliver 80% of student visa applications within 30 days.

They aim to improve this to 90% within 25 days by August 2012.

How much does it cost?

A student visa will cost you US$185 (INR 8,463.29). The INZ, New Delhi, does not accept cash or credit cards – you will have to pay through a bank cheque or a draft.

Can I work while I study?

Full-time international students are permitted to work for a maximum of 20 hours in a week while they are studying. They can also work full time during holidays.

Foreign students who wish to work while they study must apply for a variation of the conditions of their student visa. This can be done either while filling out the initial application or later – as long as their student visa is valid.

Can I work after graduation?

To encourage international students to stay after completing their courses, the New Zealand government, allows those with no job offers in hand to get a visa for up to 12 months, and work at a temporary job while they search for job in their chosen field. The set of rules under which this is allowed is known as the Graduate Job Search Work Instructions.

Students who secure a job offer upon the successful completion of their degree need to apply for a Graduate Work Experience visa under the Study to Work Instructions. This allows them to work for two years in New Zealand, in order to gain some practical work experience relevant to their qualifications.

The Graduate Work Experience visa can be granted for three years in the case of eligible overseas students who intend to gain a membership or register with a New Zealand professional association which requires more than two years of relevant work experience to join. For more information, you can visit www.immigration.govt.nz.

What about immigration opportunities?

Candidates who meet all the requirements are eligible for a Work to Residence visa. The category of visa you will get will depend on whether your occupation is on the Long Term Skills Shortage List or not.

Bear in mind…

•    If you apply for a visa through an immigration adviser, be sure that they are licensed. The INZ may decline your visa application if it has been filed on your behalf by an adviser who is not licensed. Visit the Immigration Advisers Authority for more details.
•    New Zealand defines full-time students as those attending a private training establishment (PTE) for at least 20 hours each week; studying at least three papers, or the equivalent, each semester at a tertiary institution other than a PTE; or attending a primary, intermediate, or secondary school for at least one school term.
•    You can also apply for a student visa when you are already in New Zealand. A student visa granted onshore will usually include travel conditions allowing multiple journeys, so you can travel out of New Zealand and back in before the expiry of the visa.
•    Students Online is a service that makes applying for student visas easier, coming into being through an arrangement between Immigration New Zealand and selected education providers. If you are studying with an education provider that is part of Students Online, you can apply for your student visa at the international office on campus. For a list of education providers that are part of Students Online, see www.immigration.govt.nz/sol.
•    If you are aged 17 or under you may have to be accompanied by your parent or legal guardian.
•    Foreign students can also bring their car or household items to New Zealand without having to pay any customs duty. Visit www.customs.govt.nz for more details.

Useful contacts

Vatslya Education Consultancy
Office Address: 515-516, Poddar arcade, Nr. Railway Station, Varachha, Surat.
Contact no: +91 8980883388
Email: study.vatslya@gmail.com
Website: www.vatslya.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vatslyaedu/
Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxeZ6hnyjbUrmxP6c9TNTzw

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EXPERIENCE ON YOUR YEAR ABROAD

EXPERIENCE ON YOUR YEAR ABROAD

I remember clear as day, being sat on my final plane from Sydney to Wellington after travelling for almost 30 hours, when the prospect of living in a foreign country for an entire year hit me.

I had spent the flight completely fangirling over New Zealand, a country I had been dreaming about for over a year. The moment we touched down at Wellington airport, my exhilaration and anticipation suddenly turned to nerves. What the hell had I just done? I couldn’t just nip back home now if I ended up hating New Zealand. I couldn’t just call up the family to have a quick chat due to the time difference. And things only got even scarier. What if I’d done my visa wrong? What if they didn’t let me in the country? What if this entire time they don’t actually speak English, and I wouldn’t be able to understand anyone? I think it’s safe to say this was my first instance of culture shock.

Culture shock *clears throat* can be defined as the feeling of disorientation you experience when you’re suddenly surrounded by a new, and unfamiliar culture. If you’re currently on a study exchange or year abroad and this happens to you, remember that it’s incredibly common and not a reason to panic. Here are just a handful of the hilarious (and cringe) culture shock moments I experienced on my own exchange trip to New Zealand.

Not having a clue what to do in a foreign airport

Wellington airport provided my first exposure to culture shock. Being from the UK, I was mostly used to visiting Europe, so visas are a concept I’d never had to face before. So, when I was preparing to go on exchange, I was overwhelmed by the prospect of applying for a visa. There were so many, with lots of different requirements, and I spent most of my time being completely lost and calling the immigration office up to 5,000 times a day, begging for help.

While on my last plane, the staff gave out welcome forms that we had to fill out to declare what we were bringing into the country. New Zealand is very strict when it comes to this, and if you’re found lying you can get a steep fine. I’m not sure why I struggled so much with this form. It was probably because it was my first time travelling alone, but I thought the form was solely about hand luggage. Yeah, I don’t know what I was thinking either. So, when it asked if we were bringing in any food, I happily ticked the “no” box.

So, you can imagine my horror when they placed my suitcase, containing six boxes of Jaffa Cakes and two big boxes of Yorkshire Tea (lol, “Northern lass” priorities), on the X-ray scanner. The guy in charge immediately spotted the food and proceeded to stare into my soul. All I could do was stare back, wide-eyed, attempting to plead with him. Luckily for me, my pleas were registered, and the kind gentleman allowed me to safely leave with my Jaffa Cakes and Yorkshire Tea intact. (Thank you, kind person).

Not being able to pronounce anything

I think one of the most significant cultural differences between the UK and New Zealand is that there is a widely spoken language in New Zealand other than English. Yes, of course they speak English, but I was naive enough to be unaware that most place names are in fact Maori names. My first glimpse of this was when I got off the plane to be welcomed with the words Kia ora. Maybe I should’ve done research, and learned a few basic Maori phrases.

My crappy Maori skills would be a recurring theme throughout my entire exchange. I remember, one time, I was trying to get to a city just north of Wellington, called Porirua. I happily got on the bus, and asked the Maori bus driver for a return to Porirua, only to completely butcher the name. I had pronounced it Por-eye-ru-ay, which (spoiler alert) is not how you pronounce that word. The bus driver just stared at me, trying not to laugh, and corrected me, which resulted in me cringing for the rest of the day.

I soon learnt that each vowel is pronounced entirely different in Maori. And there are several letter combinations that form completely different sounds than in English. For example, ng is pronounced as it sounds in the word singer and wh is pronounced like an f sound. I think every foreign person living in New Zealand has pronounced the word whakapapa wrong at some point. Luckily, New Zealanders tend to be sweet and get the gist of what you’re trying to say (it’s still awkward though).

My own accent made things even worse. I have quite a strong (understatement of the year) Yorkshire accent which made trying to pronounce things even worse. In Yorkshire, we don’t tend to pronounce the h at the start of a word, so hat tends to become ‘at, happy is ‘appy, and so on. So, when I tried to catch a bus to a Wellington suburb called Hataitai, you can imagine it generated a few chuckles from the driver.

Not being able to find anything in shops

It’s always confusing shopping in a foreign country, but, I had wrongly thought there wouldn’t be any issues in New Zealand. Instead, everything had a different name. Peppers were no longer peppers, they were capsicums. Courgettes were zucchinis. Heinz was called Watties…the list goes on. I’d find myself wandering around shops lost.

To make things worse, I ran out of my two massive bags of Yorkshire Tea within the first month. I ran down to Countdown (the closest supermarket to my flat) in search of England’s greatest tea (definitely not biased). Did they have it? Nope. So, I ran to the next nearest supermarket, they had it but it was $12. I didn’t want to pay for that so I had to buy the cheapest New Zealand brand I could find, which wasn’t as good as Yorkshire Tea. Fortunately, my friends all sent over Yorkshire Tea reinforcements.

Not having a clue what anyone is saying

One thing Kiwis seem to always do is mumble. I’d have to continually ask people to repeat themselves, only for me to still not have a clue what they’d said. So, I’d just awkwardly smile, hoping it would make up for the fact that I didn’t know what was going on.

At the start of lectures, some New Zealand lecturers would speak in Maori. You’re not a true exchange student if you haven’t experienced this and started shaking with fear, thinking you’ve accidentally signed up for a Maori language class.

New Zealand slang was also something I had to master. The first time somebody said, “sweet as” to me, I thought they were complimenting my body. Yes, that actually happened, and it was mortifying.

So, as you can see, culture shock can happen even somewhere as seemingly straightforward and non-threatening as New Zealand. The first few weeks in a foreign country are always the most unsettling, but remember it will pass. Culture shock may truly never leave you, but you will start to see the funny side of these moments. Not having a clue what is going on can often be the best kind of icebreaker; often locals would end up taking pity on me and looking after me.

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Hilarious Culture Shocks You’ll Experience on Your Year Abroad

Experience on Your Year Abroad

I remember clear as day, being sat on my final plane from Sydney to Wellington after travelling for almost 30 hours, when the prospect of living in a foreign country for an entire year hit me.

I had spent the flight completely fangirling over New Zealand, a country I had been dreaming about for over a year. The moment we touched down at Wellington airport, my exhilaration and anticipation suddenly turned to nerves. What the hell had I just done? I couldn’t just nip back home now if I ended up hating New Zealand. I couldn’t just call up the family to have a quick chat due to the time difference. And things only got even scarier. What if I’d done my visa wrong? What if they didn’t let me in the country? What if this entire time they don’t actually speak English, and I wouldn’t be able to understand anyone? I think it’s safe to say this was my first instance of culture shock.

Culture shock *clears throat* can be defined as the feeling of disorientation you experience when you’re suddenly surrounded by a new, and unfamiliar culture. If you’re currently on a study exchange or year abroad and this happens to you, remember that it’s incredibly common and not a reason to panic. Here are just a handful of the hilarious (and cringe) culture shock moments I experienced on my own exchange trip to New Zealand.

Not having a clue what to do in a foreign airport

Wellington airport provided my first exposure to culture shock. Being from the UK, I was mostly used to visiting Europe, so visas are a concept I’d never had to face before. So, when I was preparing to go on exchange, I was overwhelmed by the prospect of applying for a visa. There were so many, with lots of different requirements, and I spent most of my time being completely lost and calling the immigration office up to 5,000 times a day, begging for help.

While on my last plane, the staff gave out welcome forms that we had to fill out to declare what we were bringing into the country. New Zealand is very strict when it comes to this, and if you’re found lying you can get a steep fine. I’m not sure why I struggled so much with this form. It was probably because it was my first time travelling alone, but I thought the form was solely about hand luggage. Yeah, I don’t know what I was thinking either. So, when it asked if we were bringing in any food, I happily ticked the “no” box.

So, you can imagine my horror when they placed my suitcase, containing six boxes of Jaffa Cakes and two big boxes of Yorkshire Tea (lol, “Northern lass” priorities), on the X-ray scanner. The guy in charge immediately spotted the food and proceeded to stare into my soul. All I could do was stare back, wide-eyed, attempting to plead with him. Luckily for me, my pleas were registered, and the kind gentleman allowed me to safely leave with my Jaffa Cakes and Yorkshire Tea intact. (Thank you, kind person).

Not being able to pronounce anything

I think one of the most significant cultural differences between the UK and New Zealand is that there is a widely spoken language in New Zealand other than English. Yes, of course they speak English, but I was naive enough to be unaware that most place names are in fact Maori names. My first glimpse of this was when I got off the plane to be welcomed with the words Kia ora. Maybe I should’ve done research, and learned a few basic Maori phrases.

My crappy Maori skills would be a recurring theme throughout my entire exchange. I remember, one time, I was trying to get to a city just north of Wellington, called Porirua. I happily got on the bus, and asked the Maori bus driver for a return to Porirua, only to completely butcher the name. I had pronounced it Por-eye-ru-ay, which (spoiler alert) is not how you pronounce that word. The bus driver just stared at me, trying not to laugh, and corrected me, which resulted in me cringing for the rest of the day.

I soon learnt that each vowel is pronounced entirely different in Maori. And there are several letter combinations that form completely different sounds than in English. For example, ng is pronounced as it sounds in the word singer and wh is pronounced like an f sound. I think every foreign person living in New Zealand has pronounced the word whakapapa wrong at some point. Luckily, New Zealanders tend to be sweet and get the gist of what you’re trying to say (it’s still awkward though).

My own accent made things even worse. I have quite a strong (understatement of the year) Yorkshire accent which made trying to pronounce things even worse. In Yorkshire, we don’t tend to pronounce the h at the start of a word, so hat tends to become ‘at, happy is ‘appy, and so on. So, when I tried to catch a bus to a Wellington suburb called Hataitai, you can imagine it generated a few chuckles from the driver.

Not being able to find anything in shops

It’s always confusing shopping in a foreign country, but, I had wrongly thought there wouldn’t be any issues in New Zealand. Instead, everything had a different name. Peppers were no longer peppers, they were capsicums. Courgettes were zucchinis. Heinz was called Watties…the list goes on. I’d find myself wandering around shops lost.

To make things worse, I ran out of my two massive bags of Yorkshire Tea within the first month. I ran down to Countdown (the closest supermarket to my flat) in search of England’s greatest tea (definitely not biased). Did they have it? Nope. So, I ran to the next nearest supermarket, they had it but it was $12. I didn’t want to pay for that so I had to buy the cheapest New Zealand brand I could find, which wasn’t as good as Yorkshire Tea. Fortunately, my friends all sent over Yorkshire Tea reinforcements.

Not having a clue what anyone is saying

One thing Kiwis seem to always do is mumble. I’d have to continually ask people to repeat themselves, only for me to still not have a clue what they’d said. So, I’d just awkwardly smile, hoping it would make up for the fact that I didn’t know what was going on.

At the start of lectures, some New Zealand lecturers would speak in Maori. You’re not a true exchange student if you haven’t experienced this and started shaking with fear, thinking you’ve accidentally signed up for a Maori language class.

New Zealand slang was also something I had to master. The first time somebody said, “sweet as” to me, I thought they were complimenting my body. Yes, that actually happened, and it was mortifying.

So, as you can see, culture shock can happen even somewhere as seemingly straightforward and non-threatening as New Zealand. The first few weeks in a foreign country are always the most unsettling, but remember it will pass. Culture shock may truly never leave you, but you will start to see the funny side of these moments. Not having a clue what is going on can often be the best kind of icebreaker; often locals would end up taking pity on me and looking after me.

So, don’t worry, laugh at yourself, and embrace the culture shock. At least when you get home, you’ll have plenty of funny stories to tell.

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Six ways Germans could learn to deal with foreigners better

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This may be a bitter pill to swallow, but many expats live in Germany despite the people, not because of them. So how do we change this?

Expat surveys consistently show that Germany is a great place to move to. The education is first-class, it offers the ideal setting to raise children, and finding a well-paid job isn’t too difficult.

But when it comes to social life, expats always seem slightly miserable and isolated.

Obviously integration is a two-way street and there are things expats can do better to fit in, as we discuss here.

But if Germany is going to become an immigrant nation, it too is going to have to adapt. We provide a few pointers to our stern but straightforward Teutonic companions.

1. Only switch to English if asked

We are only too aware of how frustrating it probably is. You have been speaking the language of Shakespeare almost as long as we have.

But it really doesn’t help if you start by assuming you should speak English to foreigners. Of course most Germans just want to make conversation as easy as possible, but sometimes you need to have patience. The worst offenders switch to English at the slightest hint of a foreign accent in German.

So here is the rule: only switch to English if you are asked, or if the person clearly speaks no German. If you make it seem natural that the conversation is going on in German, you will put us at ease much more quickly!

2. Try a bit of small talk

German directness is something you definitely come to appreciate with time. An ability to dispassionately analyse any situation is a sign of national maturity sorely lacking from certain neighbouring countries.

But when it comes to breaking the ice, this directness can sometimes backfire.

Not everyone feels comfortable starting up a new friendship by having an involved conversation about the inner workings of their country’s political system.

While we tend to agree that there are better ways to spend your time than discussing the weather for half an hour, sometimes you have to be prepared to lose a battle to win the war.

Try warming an Englishman up with a chat about the rainy weather before smoothly seguing into: “talking about dark clouds, that whole Brexit thing is causing a bit of storm, eh?”

3. Invite people to things

Americans and Australians are almost psychopathically friendly people. They will invite you on a camping trip or to a barbecue almost before they know your name.

It’s probably no coincidence that these two countries were built by immigrants and that the need to welcome new people into a community became ingrained in their behaviour.

Like Brits, Germans are rather sedentary folks who don’t tend to stray too far from the nest. This has engendered a cautiousness that is evident in the strict difference between a Bekannter (acquaintance) and a Freund (friend).

Once we make it from Bekannter to Freund, you’re great, but does it have to take so long? There is probably no single thing that will change immigrant perceptions of Germans more than including them from the beginning.

4. Don’t over-correct

Maybe it is pedantic to point this out, and yes you are just trying to help – but being overly pedantic can be really annoying.

If you correct people while they are speaking your language, they will start to feel super self-conscious. It is probably best not to correct at all: foreigners are never going to learn German 100 percent perfectly, and you are just going to have to live with that.

So unless you really don’t understand what the person is trying to say, just let them speak their slightly garbled Denglisch.

5. Do ask to Duzen

Young Germans are much better at this anyway. But if you are not in a formal office setting that absolutely requires using “Sie” (the formal you), it is a good rule of thumb with foreigners from the Anglosphere to switch to “du” as soon as possible.

We do not have a formal way of addressing people, and we did away with calling people Mister a long time ago. The quicker you are on first name terms with us, the sooner we will feel relaxed around you.

6. Learn to flirt

What better way is there to nail down those new immigrants you need so badly then to have them fall in love with you?

Well, being a bit more flirtatious might help. A common complaint among foreigners on the dating scene in Germany is that it is so hard to know if Germans are really into you. That’s because you guys seem to chat in such a normal way that you can never be sure if you just see the relationship as friendship.

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Get simple Tips for Overseas Study Program in UK

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Plan your Abroad Study in United Kingdom

UK Visas and Immigration Department manages the visa requirement and Immigration Criteria. Foreign students from non-EU nations who seek to Study in UK require applying for the visa.

The outcome of the referendum of the country on its membership in the EU, also known as Brexit has resulted in few uncertainties over the regulations of the visa, but the government of UK has mentioned that there would not be any immediate modifications to its Visa Policies.

Types of UK Student Visa

If you are pursuing a short course and your age is more than 18 years, then you might get entitled for the Short-Term Study Visa which would be valid for a period of six months and could be extended up to the period of 11 months for short courses and English language courses respectively.

If you are looking to undertake a course for a longer period of time, you should make sure that the institute you have chosen to Pursue Education in UK should hold a license as Tier 4 Sponsor. You could also apply for Tier 4 (Child) Student Visa if your age is between 4-17 years.  And if your age is above 16, they can apply for a Tier 4 (General) Student Visa.

Utilizing your UK Student Visa

When you Migrate to UK, a stamp will be posted on your passport that mentions the duration of your stay in the country.  For instance, if your Study Abroad Program is for one year, you could stay in UK for the entire duration of the course and further for a period of four months. Prior your arrival, you should ensure that you are immunized and you are required to submit the related documents to any officer at UK entry port.You must also carry all the documents related to your education that includes your Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) number, proof of enough funds and accommodation proof as well.

Work while Study in UK

Foreign students sometimes might require getting work authorization. Foreign students from public funded higher education university or college on Tier 4 Student Visa could work up to 20 hours every week during their academic term and full time during festival breaks.

Pre- Requisites of UK Student (Tier 4 )Visa

Foreign students from outside the country or EU region should apply for a UK Student Visa who seeks to study a full-time degree course in the country. Student Visas are not granted for part-time study courses. Your entitlement is measured using a point’s based system known as Tier 4 Student Visa.

There are certain criteria to be fulfilled by any foreign student who is looking to apply for student visa.They are as follows:

Study Abroad Course Confirmation

You should avail a CAS, generally known as Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies from a university in the country which is accredited by Visa and Immigration department of the country.

Universities in the United Kingdom should have got Highly Trusted Status (HTS) on the list of Tier 4 sponsor from visa and immigration department of the country.  ‘A’ rated colleges could also grant CAS numbers.

All the UK universities have got the HTS. You could also view the university profiles for additional information about Universities in UK, or you could also search for a list of courses suitable for you.

Enough Funds to Study in UK

You should also provide the proof that you got sufficient money for funding your Overseas EducationApart from your tuition fees, you should also show that you have got enough funds to pay for your cost of living.

Student Visa Application

To submit your application for Tier 4 Student Visa, you can visit the Visa and Immigration portal of UK and fill up your online application form completely and send it.  Foreign students from across the globe have to send their online visa application. You would be asked to provide your photographs and biometric information taken at center for visa application. Vatslya is among the Best Education Consultants in India that offers your personal assistance and guidance on your submission of Visa Application.

Immigration Health Surcharge

All the non-EU Citizens who come to stay in UK for a longer period of time are required to pay health service charges for getting access to the National Health Service of the country. The health surcharge is for foreign students who seek to pursue an education in the country and it is payable when you send your visa application.

If you are looking to Study in UK, it is recommended that you go with a company that has got years of experience in the Overseas Education Process. Vatslya is one of the Best Education Consultants in India who helps you in your UK Education and Admission Process.

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