How to Prepare for IELTS Exam | Tips to Crack IELTS in First Attempt

IELTS tips

How to Prepare for IELTS Exam

If your next step is to study abroad, then you have to pass the International English Language Testing System [IELTS] first. How to Prepare for IELTS Exam is the major problem for the contenders who plan to study or immigrate to the other countries. So to help you with your preparation, we are providing the Tips to Crack IELTS in First Attempt. To give yourself the best opportunity to achieve this goal, you need to be painstaking in your preparation and capable of providing critical literary analysis in both written and oral formats.

IELTS, the International English Language Testing System, is designed to assess the language ability of candidates who need to study or work where English is the language of communication. Though most of us try to converse in English these days But in India, where English is not a native language, most of us may not be proficient in the language.

  • In Listening, use the example at the beginning of the first section to familiarize yourself with the sound, the situation, and the speakers.
  • Keep listening until the recording stops, looking only at the questions that relate to the part being played.
  • There are often pauses in the recording between different sections. Use these to prepare for the next set of questions.
  • Answer Listening questions in the order they appear on the Question Paper. Remember that they normally follow the order of the information in the recording.
  • At the end of the recording you have some time to transfer your answers to the Answer Sheet. Check your grammar and spelling as you do so.
  • In Academic Reading, begin by going quickly through each passage to identify features such as the topic, the style, the likely source, the writer’s purpose and the intended reader.
  • As you read, don’t try to understand the precise meaning of every word or phrase. You don’t have time, and those parts of the text might not be tested anyway.
  • Reading tasks sometimes have an example answer. If this is the case, study it and decide why it is correct.
  • Some tasks require you to use words from the text in the answer; in others you should use your own words. Check the instructions carefully.
  • The instructions may also include a word limit, e.g. Use no more than three words. Keep to this by avoiding unnecessary words in your answer.
  • In Academic Writing, you must always keep to the topic set. Never try to prepare sections of text before the exam.
  • Keep to the suggested timing: there are more marks possible for Task 2 than Task 1.
  • Organize and link your ideas and sentences appropriately, using a wide range of language and showing your ability (in Task 2) to discuss ideas and express opinions.
  • If you write less than 150 words in Task 1 or less than 250 in Task 2 you will lose marks, but there is no maximum number of words for either.
  • When you plan your essay, allow plenty of time at the end to check your work.
  • In Speaking, don’t try to give a prepared speech, or talk about a different topic from the one you are asked to discuss.
  • Always speak directly to the Examiner, not to the recording equipment.
  • Whenever you reply ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ to the Examiner’s questions, add more details to your answer. In each case, aim to explain at least one point.
  • Remember that you are not being tested on your general knowledge but on your ability to communicate effectively.
  • Organize and link your ideas and sentences appropriately, talking clearly at normal speed and using a wide range of structures and vocabulary.

IELTS Exam Tips – Listening Section Tips:-

  • Read the questions at the beginning of each section carefully before the recording starts. This will help applicants to follow the recording & identify the appropriate answer.
  • Concentrate on the introduction of each section which will give you useful information about the situations & the speakers.
  • Listen very carefully for clues that indicate which stage of the recording they are listening to for example words such as ‘Firstly’, ‘Lastly’.
  • Write your answers clearly without any grammatical mistakes, otherwise you will not be awarded with any marks.

IELTS Exam Tips – Reading Section Tips:-

  • Concentrate on the item as it may pass very fast, so make sure you don’t spend too much time any question or text.
  • Start from beginning of the exam, if you are unable to answer, do not waste your time and move on to next one. You can re-visit the question later, if you have time.
  • Read instructions carefully and concentrate on title of text subtitles & illustration to get a quick idea of what the text is for.
  • Make sure to answer without any grammar mistakes. Copy words accurately so that you can avoid any spelling mistakes.

IELTS Exam Tips – Writing Section Tips:-

  • Make sure your ideas are relevant to the questions and your last paragraph should be a conclusion which is consistent with the arguments you have included in your essay.
  • Avoid any spelling, grammar mistakes and write as clearly as possible.
  • Organized and logically linked paragraphs and also make sure to have language used is in academic style.
  • Write with required number of words and do not use bullet points.

IELTS Exam Tips – Speaking Section Tips:-

  • Make sure to involve in the conversation and concentrate on the questions being asked.
  • Always answer the questions with some detailed manner.
  • Always support your opinions with good examples.
  • There is no right or wrong answers in the speaking test and this is just to assess on how good

In the end, we must understand that listening comprehension skills improve with more and more practice. But reading skills improve with more and more analysis. Always spend time in finding out why certain questions went wrong. The above mentioned tips are a few important things we advise you to keep in mind for promising results.

Students if you want to know more about How to Prepare for IELTS Exam then stay connected with us through our web portal that is http://blog.vatslya.com/  and get latest information time to time. You can also follow us on Facebook and Google plus to remain updated. You can also subscribe on our free email service from this you can get all career related information directly in your mail box.

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Reading task type one: summary completion

IELTS tips

Task description

The input for this type of question will be a summary of all or part of the reading text. The summary will contain a number of gaps. All of the information in the summary will be contained in the reading text, although the words used will be different. You will also be provided with a list of words to use to fill the gaps. There will be more words than gaps. These words have been chosen so that only one word will be suitable for each gap (the answer) but other words may appear suitable (distracters).

Your task is to complete the summary using one word from the list for each gap. Because the summary is a paraphrase of the reading text (rather than an edited version), you will need to have a good understanding of the overall meaning and main points of the section summarised, rather than a detailed understanding of the text.

What is being tested is your ability to:

  • skim the text for information
  • paraphrase the original text

Sample task


Complete the summary below. Choose your answers from the box at the bottom of the page and write them in boxes 1-8 on your answer sheet.

NBThere are more words than spaces so you will not use them all. You may use any of the words more than once.

passengers happy float advanced
lifeboats confident dangers ocean
worried inadequate enormous excitement
fast handbook water float
record fast procedures orders
drown size sink safety

The Finest Ship Ever Built
The North Atlantic Ocean crossing on the Titanic was expected to set a new standard for oceantravel in terms of comfort and safety The shipping industry had an excellent safety record on the North Atlantic Crossing over the previous forty years and the Titanic was the finest and safest liner ever built. The Titanic combined the greatest technology of the day with sheer size, luxury and new safety features. The Titanic’s owners were confident that even if the Titanic were letting in watershe would float indefinitely until help arrived. In hindsight we know that the Titanic was not unsinkable and that technology alone could not save lives when facilities were inadequate and humans did not follow safe procedures whether because of arrogance or ignorance.

How to approach summary completion questions


Step 1: Read the instructions carefully. Note that in this case you have to choose your answers from the words provided. Also note that in this case you can use any word more than once. Remember though that every IELTS test is different. So make sure that you read the instructions carefully even if you have practised the type of question before.
Step 2: Skim through the summary to get an idea of the topic. In this case the summary refers generally to peoples’ views about the Titanic in terms of safety.
Step 3: Decide which section of the text the summary covers – in this case mainly paragraphs A and C. In some cases the summary may cover the whole text.
Step 4: Read through the summary, referring to the list of words each time you reach a gap. Select one or more possible words from the list to fill each gap. Reject any words that do not fit grammatically, even if the meaning seems correct. Confirm your choice by referring to the relevant sections of the text.
Step 5: Quickly read through your completed summary to check that it makes sense.

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Some Tips that will assure a High Score in IELTS Exam

IELTS tips

The IELTS exam is an important prerequisite for candidates who need to study or work in countries where English is the medium of communication. Designed to test English language skills across four modules (reading, speaking, writing and listening), this Exam is recognised by Universities and employers in many countries.


Across the globe, professional bodies, immigration authorities and other government agencies accept IELTS scores as a benchmark to determine proficiency in English language skills. Candidates who wish to go for higher education must write the Academic IELTS Test, whereas those who wish to go for a career abroad write the General Training IELTS Test.
As with any Exam, there are certain techniques that must be followed to achieve success. You will be able to learn basic rules of grammar and vocabulary at a good English course.

 

Here are some tips that you should follow, to avoid mistakes in the exam.

1. Time: Please stick to the time constraints mentioned for each section. If you overrun your time in one section, you may need to leave questions unanswered in other sections and will lose marks.

2. Read the question carefully: if an answer is to be written in ‘not more than three words’, do not write four.

3. Number of words: Again, if you need to write a paragraph of 250 words and you only write 225, you will lose marks. Be careful with your numbers! Longer essays may lose you marks as the chance of making mistakes increases when your answers are too long.

4. Stick to the topic: Do not stray off the topic, or elaborate on matters that are not strictly to the point.

5. Understand the topic: The examiners are looking for specific topics. If you write on something else you will not be marked at all.

6. Plagiarism: Some students try to memorise essays. This never works, as examiners can easily find out if your standard is not consistent through the exam. If your essay is brilliant (as it is one that has been learnt by heart!) and the rest of your work doesn’t match that standard, it becomes obvious that your essay is not original and you can be penalized harshly.

7. You are required to express your own view. There are no right or wrong opinions, and you will be able to express your thoughts better if your views are those which you yourself believe in.

8. Keep your sentences short and crisp. Avoid unnecessarily long sentences, which can lead to more mistakes.

9. During the Speaking test, your accent does not matter, as much as the coherence of your speech and your ability to make yourself understood. If English is not your native language, they will understand that you may have an accent. The examiner will usually be someone who is familiar with your accent.

10. If you wish to save time, use shortcut keys on your computer, such as Ctrl+ C = Copy. Check online to find a list of the most common shortcut keys that will work for your system.

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10 Common Mistakes You Make in Tests | Avoid These Common Mistakes

IELTS tips

Test can have a major impact on students overall marks! It’s not uncommon for a final test to be worth of the overall grade for a course. Before appearing for any test students should Avoid These Common Mistakes in Tests .Often, these test has much impact on students’ grades as ALL of the homework assignments they have completed throughout the entire semester…combined! From here students can check 10 Common Mistakes You Make in Tests.

10 Common Mistakes You Make in Tests

Unfortunately, most students have never learned how to study efficiently for exams. And the techniques they think are valuable are actually not as functional as they believe.

Avoid These Common Mistakes You Make in Tests

1. Leaving An Answer Blank

There is not anything wrong with leaving out over a hard question to give yourself some additional time to think it over–just as long as you keep in mind to go back to the question later. The danger is not remembering to go reverse to every question you’ve leave out. A blank answer is always an incorrect answer!

Solution: Every time you skip a question, put a check mark beside it and avoid these common mistakes you make in tests.

2. Answering A Question Twice

You’d be amazed how many times students opt two answers in multiple choice question. This makes both responses incorrect!

Solution: analysis your work and make definite each true/false and multiple choice question only has one answer circled and avoid these common mistakes you make in tests!

3. Transferring Answers Incorrectly From Scratch Paper

The most annoying mistake for arithmetic students is having an answer right on the scratch paper, but answering it wrong to the test!

Solution: Check your answer two times and then transfer answer from a scratch sheet.

4. Starting With The Hardest Questions

Despite the fact that you might feel like you want to get the toughest stuff out of the way first – like when you eat your vegetable before your roast potatoes – this possibly isn’t the excellent idea and this is one of the 10 Common Mistakes You Make in Tests.

Do questions you are surer with first, and you’ll be in full flow by the time it comes to the mean stuff.

5. Studying The Wrong Chapter

Whenever you have a test coming up, make sure that you understand which chapters or lectures the test will cover. There are times when a teacher will test you on a specific chapter that is never discussed in class. On the other hand, the teacher’s lectures may cover three chapters, and the test may cover only one of those chapters.

6. Ignoring The Clock.

One of the most general errors students face when writing an essay or article in test is failing to manage time and this is one of the 10 Common Mistakes You Make in Tests.

Solution: Always take the first few moments of an exam to evaluate the situation when it comes to essay questions and answers. Give yourself a time plan and stick to it. Give yourself a set amount of time to summarize and answer each essay question and stick to your plan!

7. Not Following Directions

If the teacher says “evaluate” and you “describe,” you are going to lose points on your response. There are certain directional words that you should understand and follow when you take a test.

  • Solution: Know the following directional words:
  • Define: Provide a description.
  • Explain: Provide an answer that gives an entire overview or clear explanation of the problem and solution for a particular question.
  • Analyze: Take apart a conception or a process, and explain it step by step.
  • Contrast: Show differences.
  • Compare: Show similarity and differences.
  • Diagram: Explain and draw a chart or other visual to illustrate your points.
  • Outline: Provide an explanation with headings and subheadings.

8. Not Doing Past Papers

If your lecturer provides you with earlier papers and you don’t look at every single one of them ten times over then it’s really your own fault if you don’t ace them. You’re basically being told, more or less, what will be on the paper.

Questions may be worded somewhat differently, but if you can answer every question from the last five years then there’s a excellent chance that you have prepared well for your exam.

9. Cramming The Night Before

Yes, there’s no uncertainty that you’re proficient of picking up small bits of information in the hours before an exam, but more significant than those one or two marks you might add is ensuring you get a good night’s sleep.

Resting correctly means your brain will be working more proficiently when exam time rolls around. You’ll be able to remember things more clearly, think quicker, and be an all round better version of yourself. So go to bed!

10. Not Putting Name On Test.

There are times when students fail to write their name on a test and this result in a failing grade. This can happen when the test administrator doesn’t know the students, or when the teacher won’t see students again after the test is over (like at the end of a school year). In these situations (or even if you have a very strict teacher) a test that doesn’t have a name attached to it will be tossed out.

We have provided 10 Common Mistakes You Make in Tests for students and it will be surely helpful for you and try to Avoid These Common Mistakes

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IELTS Speaking Test #2

IELTS tips

>> Part 1

– Please come in. Why don’t you take a seat?
– First, let me have. a look at your passport. It is for security purposes.
– Good. What’s your full name?
– And you are (nationality of the candidate).
– Which part of your country do you come from?
– Describe your home town to me.
– When choosing a place to live, what do you consider most important?
– What do you like or dislike about living in your town or city?
– What changes would make your home town more appealing to people of your age?
– Would you prefer to live in a traditional house or in a modern apartment?
– Some people prefer to live in a small town. Others prefer to live in a big city. Which one do you prefer?
– Some people are always in a hurry to go to places and get things done. Other people prefer to take their time and live life at a lower pace. What do you prefer? Do you work at the moment?
– What are the best things about where you work?
– What do you dislike most about your work?

>> Part 2

– what you like or dislike about it Discuss points about life in your country. You should mention:
– what the biggest social problem of your country is
… and what you would regard as the most significant events in your country’s recent history

>> Part 3

– Do you think that people and situation have changed since you were born?
– How and in what respects?
– What are some of the main industries in your country?
– How serious is unemployment in your country?
– What do you consider as the main cause?
– What role does religion have in everyday life in your country?
– Compare the media now with how it was a generation ago.
– What kind of effects do the media have on children and young people?
– Can you tell me about your childhood?
– Can you remember a toy you were given when you were a child?
– Who gave it to you? And what was the occasion?
– What did you do with the toy?
– What do you think you can learn from your toy?
– Do you think there is a difference between toys chosen by females and males?
– This is the end of your interview. Thank you and good bye.

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IELTS Speaking Test #1

IELTS tips

Part 1


  • Listen carefully to the introduction to each section. This will give you useful information about the situation and the speakers.
  • Use the time at the beginning of each section (and in the middle of Sections 1–3) to look through the questions and think about the topic.
  • Read the instructions for each task carefully. Remember to check the maximum number of words allowed.
  • Write all your answers as you listen – remember, you won’t hear the recording a second time.
  • Check that what you write makes sense in the context.
  • Pay attention to any examples that are provided.
  • Keep to the word limit: if you are asked for ‘NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS’, for example, then do not write more.
  • Try to answer all the questions, even if you don’t feel sure about an answer – you may have understood more than you think.
  • Transfer your answers at the end of the test. You have 10 minutes for this, which is plenty of time. P Write clearly when you transfer your answers. If an answer isn’t clear on your answer sheet, you will lose the mark.
  • Check your spelling (and grammar, where necessary).

Part 2


Try to discuss points about marriage ceremony. You should include:

  • what happens at a typical wedding ceremony in your country?
  • how is it different from a typical wedding in Britain?
  • do you have any memories of .your / your friend’s wedding ceremony?

Part 3


  • What roles do men / women typically play in families in your country?
  • How different is your life from the lives of your parents / grandparents?
  • How have these roles changed recently?
  • Entertainment is a very important part of our lives. Most people listen to the radio or watch television. How did people entertain themselves before these things came into existence?
  • Do you think radio and television have had a positive effect on the world?
  • Has television stopped family members from communicating with each other?
  • Is there too much violence on television these days?
  • Does violence on television or on video contribute to violence in society?
  • Thank you and good luck.
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The interview: section four – IELTS

IELTS tips

Task description
Using your CV as a starting point, the interviewer will ask you about your future plans. The interviewer will aim to involve you in a discussion exploring possible problems, your concerns, your expectations, your hopes and possible steps to achieving your goals.

>>  Sample questions

It is not possible to predict what questions will come up at this point in the test except that you know that the topic will be your future. The questions will be drawn from your CV, or from what the examiner has learned about you in the earlier sections of the interview, and most will arise naturally from the discussion and the information you are giving as this section progresses.

What is being tested is your ability to:

  • give in-depth answers to questions about your future
  • use the language of speculation
  • explain and defend your actions, plans, assumptions, predictions, reasons etc

Strategies for approaching the task

Carefully consider your future plans before the test. If you haven’t definitely decided what career path you will follow, then choose one plan to talk about in the interview. For example, if you haven’t decided whether you want to be an astronaut or a business man, choose one – whichever you think is the easier to talk about – and don’t bother to mention the other at the interview.

Prepare all the vocabulary you will need to discuss that career path, especially the steps you will need to take to reach your desired position and how you would overcome any possible problems.

Be prepared to use conditional sentences to discuss, for example, what you will do if you achieve your goal or you cannot achieve your goal; for example:

If I can’t go to an Australian university to study, I will have to work in my parents’ business

Be prepared to use perfect tenses to explain how you got to the situation you are in now. For example:

Interviewer: How did you decide to become an engineer?

Candidate: Well, I’d (or I’ve) always been very good at maths, so after finishing high school I …

Be prepared to speculate about the future:

I hope to …
I’m hoping to …
I’d like to …
If possible I’d like to …
I plan to …
I’ve always dreamed of …
I assume that …
I’m assuming that …
I expect that …

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The interview: section two – IELTS

IELTS tips

Task description
In this section the interviewer will move onto one or more topics of general interest. You may need to speak longer (take longer turns) than in the first section and you may need to describe or explain.

Sample questions
It is not possible to predict what topics may be discussed at this point in the interview; however, some standard topics are:

  • Traditional or modern buildings in your country
  • Tourism and tourist sites
  • Celebrations and cultural activities
  • Family and family relationships
  • Schooling and the education system in your country
  • City and country living
  • Modern and traditional lifestyles

If the interview does not take place in your country of origin, you may be asked to compare your country’s architecture, level of tourism, culture etc with those of the country you are living in.

What is being tested is your ability to:

  • take longer turns in a conversation
  • give information involving description and explanation

Strategies for approaching the task


Carefully consider what you know about each of the topics above. Try to think of all the questions that someone who was trying to get to know you might ask, and make sure that you have all the vocabulary you need to discuss the topics in depth. Check and practise the pronunciation of any new vocabulary. Where there are contentious issues, try to develop an opinion.

You will perform better in the IELTS interview if your speech is fluent. And you’re likely to be more fluent if you have already thought about the topic and have some ideas to express. This doesn’t mean memorising or rehearsing a speech because you can never be sure exactly what the questions will be, and also the examiner will immediately ask a different question if s/he suspects that your answer is memorised.

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The interview: section one – IELTS

IELTS tips

Task description
Section One of the interview is an introduction in which the interviewer will ask you some general questions about yourself. The questions are often, but not always, based on the CV that you filled out before the test. This section of the interview aims to be like a friendly conversation in which the interviewer asks questions that are not too difficult, to try to get to know you and relax you.

Sample questions


Prior to the test, you will be asked to fill in a CV (Curriculum Vitae) which will ask for general information about topics such as the following:

  • Your country of origin
  • Where you learnt English
  • How long you have been learning English
  • Level of education achieved
  • Interests and future plans

The first section of the test will go something like this:

  • The interviewer greets the candidate and introduces himself or herself.
  • The interviewer asks the candidate to state his or her name clearly for the cassette.
  • The interviewer asks to see the candidate’s passport and CV form.

Typical questions for this stage of the test might be:

  • It says on your CV that you are interested in … Could you tell me why you like it?
  • How often do you … ?
  • With whom? Where?
  • Why are you taking the IELTS test?
  • Is this your hometown?
  • If not, tell me about the place you come from.
  • Would you rather live here or there?
  • Tell me how the public transport system in your hometown compares with here.
  • If yes, what do you like about living here?
  • Are there any bad points about this place?

Strategies for approaching the task


Firstly, you should be very careful what you write on your CV as this could be the basis for the discussion in this part of the test and may influence the interviewer’s choice of topics for the second part of the test as well. Remember that one of the aims of this section is to get you talking freely so that the interviewer can assess your level of English. The interviewer wants you to talk about something you are interested in so that you will perform your best. It is for this reason that you are asked to write down some information about yourself that the interviewer can use as a basis for the questions.

One question on the CV asks you to write down your interests. Make sure that you are prepared to talk about the interests you write down here. For example, if one of your interests is scuba diving, make sure that you learn the vocabulary you need to discuss this topic in English before the test. And check the pronunciation with a native speaker of English if possible.

One candidate wrote down that she was interested in the environment, though in fact, she knew nothing about environmental issues. The interviewer, thinking that this would be a good topic to get the candidate talking freely, began to ask question after questions about the candidate’s views on various issues related to the environment. The candidate didn’t have the language to cope with the questions and also didn’t have any ideas to express about the issues. So instead of the candidate feeling relaxed from the beginning of the interview talking about a familiar topic, she felt very uncomfortable and may not have performed as well as she could as a result.

So choose carefully what you write down on the CV and prepare the language you will need to discuss these topics before the test. This does not mean that you should memorise a speech as the interviewer will immediately change the topic if s/he thinks that what you are saying is rehearsed. It would be more useful to find people with whom you can practise speaking about the topics.

You should also be prepared to use the past, present and present perfect tenses to describe your current situation. For example, ‘I have been studying English for two years since I moved to the city.

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The speaking component – IELTS

IELTS tips
The IELTS speaking test takes around 15 minutes and is in the form of an interview. The interview will most probably seem like a friendly conversation which typically covers some aspects of your past, present and future situations. The interviewer will direct the conversation through questions which mostly focus on you and your opinions.

The interview has four main sections:

  • some general questions about yourself
  • a discussion of topics of general interest
  • a role play
  • a discussion of your future plans and a conclusion

It is important that you relax and speak as confidently as you can. Candidates who are difficult to draw into the conversation may not achieve their potential band score simply because they haven’t been able to demonstrate the level of language they are capable of producing.

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