Online IELTS Course

IELTS tips

We are in the process of adding our online learning courses to the website to help you prepare for the academic or general module of the IELTS exam. You will be able to use the material if your level is around IELTS 4 but if your level is higher you should still find it challenging and useful.


Clearly, the overall aim of the course is to help you maximise your IELTS score, which is why you are here! However, we believe that the best way to do well in IELTS is to develop your overall ability to communicate in English: just doing practice IELTS test is not the best way to prepare for the exam.

To do well in IELTS you need to:

  • speak and write confidently, fluently, and accurately on a wide range of topics.
  • understand information quickly and accurately in different types of reading and listening texts on a wide range of topics.
  • have confident control of a wide range of grammar and vocabulary.

To achieve these goals you should:

  • read and listen to as much as English as you can in your spare time.
  • take the opportunity to speak with and write to English speakers whenever possible.
  • keep your own vocabulary records and continue to build your vocabulary both inside and outside the course.
  • pay attention to your own grammar and pronunciation: accuracy is important.

Keep an eye out as we are hoping to unveil some new courses for the coming year very soon!

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How your IELTS score is viewed???

IELTS tips

Candidates receive scores on a Band Scale from 1 to 9 for each skill tested (Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking). They are of equal importance. These four scores are then averaged and rounded to produce an Overall Band Score. Each candidate receives a Test Report Form setting out their Overall Band Score and their scores for each test. The scores are reported in whole bands or half bands according to the nine-band score given below.

The Listening Test contains 40 items and each correct item is given one mark. the maximum raw score a candidate can achieve on a paper is 40. Band scores ranging from Band 1 to Band 9 are awarded to candidates on the basis of their raw scores.

The Reading Test contains 40 items and each correct item is given one mark. The Academic and General Training Reading Tests are graded to the same level. However, because the texts in the Academic Reading Test are more challenging overall than those in the General Training Test, more questions need to be answered correctly on a General Training Test to receive the same grade.

The tables below indicate the mean raw scores achieved by candidates at various levels in each of the Listening, Academic Reading and General Training Reading tests. They provide an indication of the number of marks required to achieve a particular band score.

Listening

Band score Raw score out of 40
5 16
6 23
7 30
8 35

Academic Reading

Band score Raw score out of 40
5 15
6 23
7 30
8 35

General Training Reading

Band score Raw score out of 40
5 15
6 23
7 30
8 34

The Writing Test (both Academic and General Training) is marked on the following areas: Task Achievement (for Task 1), Task Response (for Task 2), Coherence and Cohesion, Lexical Resource, Grammatical Range and Accuracy. Examiners give a Band Score for each of these criteria, which are equally weighted.

For the Speaking Test, a Band Score is given for each of the following which are equally weighted: Fluency and Coherence, Lexical Resource, Grammatical Range and Pronunciation.

When marking the Writing and Speaking components, examiners use detailed performance descriptors which describe written and spoken performance at each of the 9 IELTS bands.

Writing

Criterion Weighting
Task achievement (Task 1)/Task response (Task 2) 25%
Coherence and cohesion 25%
Lexical resource 25%
Grammatical range and accuracy 25%

Speaking

Criterion Weighting
Fluency and coherence 25%
Lexical resource 25%
Grammatical range and accuracy 25%
Pronunciation 25%

Overall band scores are reported to the nearest whole or half band. The following rounding convention applies; if the average across the four skills ends in .25, it is rounded up to the next half band, and if it ends in .75, it is rounded up to the next whole band.

Thus, a test taker achieving 6.5 for Listening, 6.5 for Reading, 5.0 for Writing and 7.0 for Speaking would be awarded an overall band score of 6.5 (25 ÷ 4 = 6.25 = Band 6.5).

Likewise, a test taker achieving 4.0 for Listening, 3.5 for Reading, 4.0 for Writing and 4.0 for Speaking would be awarded an overall band score of 4.0 (15.5 ÷ 4 = 3.875 = Band 4.0).

On the other hand, a test taker achieving 6.5 for Listening, 6.5 for Reading, 5.5 for Writing and 6.0 for Speaking would be awarded band 6 (24.5 ÷ 4 = 6.125 = Band 6).

If you do the practice tests under exam conditions, you need to score approximately 20 marks on both the Reading and Listening Test for a Band Score of around 5.5. To achieve a Band Score of 7, you need approximately 30 marks on Reading and Listening.

IELTS Band Scores


9 Expert user:
has fully operational command of the language: appropriate, accurate and fluent with complete understanding.
8 Very good user:
has fully operational command of the language with only occasional unsystematic inaccuracies and inappropriacies. Misunderstandings may occur in unfamiliar situations. Handles complex detailed argumentation well.
7 Good user:
has operational command of the language, though with occasional inaccuracies, inappropriacies and misunderstandings in some situations. Generally handles complex language well and understands detailed reasoning.
6 Competent user:
has generally effective command of the language despite some inaccuracies, inappropriacies and misunderstandings. Can use and understand fairly complex language, particularly in familiar situations.
5 Modest user:
has partial command of the language, coping with overall meaning in most situations, though is likely to make many mistakes. Should be able to handle basic communication in own field.
4 Limited user:
basic competence is limited to familiar situations. Has frequent problems in understanding and expression. Is not able to use complex language.
3 Extremely limited:
conveys and understands only general meaning in very familiar situations. Frequent breakdowns in communication occur.
2 Intermittent user:
no real communication is possible except for the most basic information using isolated words or short formulae in familiar situations and to meet immediate needs. Has great difficulty understanding spoken and written English.
1 Non-user:
essentially has no ability to use the language beyond possibly a few isolated words.
0 Did not attempt:
No assessable information provided.
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IELTS Speaking

IELTS tips

The Speaking Module is the final part of the exam. It does not need to be taken on the same day as the other Modules. It takes the form of three-part oral interview, which takes between 11 and 14 minutes.

IELTS Speaking Part 1

Introduction and interview (4-5 minutes)
In the first part, the examiner will ask you a number of general questions. Be prepared to introduce yourself and talk about things which are personal to you, for example, your country and home town, your family, your studies or work, what you like doing in your free time and what you might do in the future.

IELTS Speaking Part 2

Individual long turn (3-4 minutes)
In this part, the examiner will give you a card that asks you to talk about a person, place, event or object. You will have 1 minute to prepare to speak, and then you will talk for 1-2 minutes, during which the examiner will not speak. The examiner will then ask one or two rounding-off questions.

IELTS Speaking Part 3

Two-way discussion (4-5 minutes)
In the last part, you will talk with the examiner about issues related to the topic on the card. However, the discussion will be on less personal topics. For example, in Part 2 you may talk about a teacher you had at school, but in Part 3 you might talk about education in your country.

Marking

Performance is assessed on the following criteria:

Fluency and Coherence: Do you express ideas and opinions clearly and coherently, without long hesitations?

Lexical Resources: Do you use a wide range of vocabulary?

Grammatical Range and Accuracy: Do you use a wide range of structures and make only a few minor mistakes?

Pronunciation: Are you easy to understand? Do you use English pronunciation features naturally?

The overall result is translated into a score on the IELTS nine-band score.

What can I do to improve my performance at the Speaking test?

  • Be relaxed and try to be friendly. Remember the examiner is trying to find out what you know, not what you don’t know.
  • You can ask the examiner to repeat the question if you did not understand it the first time.
  • Record yourself or practice speaking on a variety of topics for 1 – 2 minutes. This will help you gain confidence and practice time management.
  •  Vocabulary – don’t use unfamiliar, long words if you are not sure of their meaning.
  • If you cannot remember the exact word you want, paraphrase and try to express your idea using similar words.
  • Practice making notes, spider-grams, and mind maps which will help you to talk on various topics in one minute.
  • Try to develop your answers instead of answering in just one word. Speak loudly and clearly into the recorder.
  • Avoid using slang and abbreviations.
  • Please do not tell the examiner what grade you require or ask how well you have done. This will only cause embarrassment.
  • Do not use memorized chunks of language. Examiners are trained to recognize this. Furthermore, what you have memorized may not be relevant to the topic being discussed.
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IELTS Writing

IELTS tips

IELTS tests candidates’ ability to produce two quite different pieces of writing in a fairly short period of time. The test is divided into two parts and candidates are allowed 60 minutes to complete both parts.

Academic


The IELTS Academic Writing test takes 60 minutes. Candidates have to complete two tasks, of 150 and 250 words. In task 1, candidates are asked to describe some information in the form of one or more bar charts,line graphs, diagrams, pie charts or tables. In task 2, candidates are given an opinion, a problem or an issue to discuss.

IELTS Writing Task 1

In the first part, candidates will be given a task based on some information, presented in graphic and diagrammatic form. Candidates are expected to write a descriptive report of at least 150 words on the information provided.

IELTS Writing Task 2

In the second task, candidates are assessed on their ability to produce a clear and logical argument on a given topic. Most of the topics are of general interest to, suitable for and easily understood by students at undergraduate or postgraduate level. Candidates will have to write at least 250 words and, as task 2 is longer than task 1, it is suggested that about 40 minutes is spent on this task and 20 minutes on the first task.

General


The IELTS General Training Writing test takes 60 minutes. Candidates have to complete two tasks, of 150 and 250 words, as in the Academic module. However, task 1 is always a letter, while task 2 is an essay based on a given topic. The topics of the questions will be of general interest, and no specialist knowledge is required. For example, topics can include travel, accommodation, current affairs, shops and services, health and welfare, health and safety, recreation, social and physical environment.

IELTS Writing Task 1

In task 1, candidates are asked to write a letter which may need to be semi-formal or formal in tone in response to a given problem or situation. Candidates will be asked to include information relating to three bullet points in the question. Candidate answers should be at least 150 words in length for this task.

IELTS Writing Task 2

In task 2, candidates are asked to discuss a topic in response to a statement which presents a particular point of view, argument or issue. The task requires candidates to write a discursive piece of writing in which the question will typically ask them to discuss factual information, discuss a problem and present solutions, evaluate ideas or justify opinions. Candidate answers for task 2 should be at least 250 words in length.

Marking


In IELTS writing test you are assessed on:

Task Achievement (in task 1): This assesses how appropriately, accurately and relevantly your answer meets the requirements of the task.

Task Response (in task 2): This assesses your ability to formulate and develop a position in response to the prompts given in the task.

Coherence and Cohesion: This assesses whether your writing makes logical sense and whether the different parts of your writing are connected to each other correctly.

Lexical Resource: This assesses your ability to use different vocabulary appropriately.

Grammatical Range and Accuracy: This assesses your ability to use different grammatical structures appropriately and accurately.

The overall result is translated into a score on the IELTS nine-band score.

What can I do to improve my performance at the Writing test?

  • Make sure you answer everything that is asked in the question, and that you have written the number of words required. Remember you do not lose marks for writing more but you do lose for writing fewer words than required.
  • This is not a test of your knowledge. You can state your opinions, provided you are able to give evidence to support them.
  • Don’t go off topic. Underline key words in the questions to help you know exactly what is required in the answers.
  • Support the points you make with examples (from your own experiences if possible) or data.
  • Write neatly and clearly and check for mistakes before you submit your answers.
  • Write in complete sentences. Do not use bullet points and do not use short forms of words.
  • Do not repeat the same ideas just to reach the word count needed.
  • Task 2 – Make sure you present a balanced point of view giving both the pros and cons of the statement you are asked to discuss.
  • Spend more time on Task 2 – you have to write at least 250 words for this. Plan your answer, giving an introduction, conclusion and writing each new idea in a new paragraph. You may want to do a brief rough draft before you begin your answer.
  • Do not use memorised answers. They probably won’t be relevant to the question asked and examiners can recognise them easily.
  • Do not begin by copying the questions – especially in Task1 where you may have the description of data or bullet points for your letter. This is a waste of time as these parts are not included in your word count.
  • Make sure the tone you adopt is consistent and relevant to the task.
  • Use linking words to ensure that your ideas flow smoothly.

Avoid common mistakes:


  • Spelling (English is often not written the same way it is spoken)
  • Punctuation (e.g. basic errors with using capital letters and full stops)
  • Not using enough paragraphs and not clearly dividing them.
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IELTS Speaking Tips – Part 3

IELTS tips

In The third section involves a discussion between the examiner and the candidate, generally on questions relating to the theme which they have already spoken about in part 2.

  • Beautiful places
  • Family
  • Shopping
  • Eating and food
  • Travelling
  • School
  • Adventure
  • Newspapers
  • Sport

Beautiful places


Attitudes to tourism

  • Why do you think people like to travel to different places in their free time?
  • How do you see tourism changing in your country in the future?

Conserving the countryside

  • Why is it important to protect the countryside?
  • In what ways is the countryside in danger in your country?

Historic buildings and monuments

  • Why are historic buildings and monuments important to a city?
  • Is it better to keep old buildings, or build new modern ones?

Family


Attitudes to family

  • In what ways have families in your country changed in recent years?
  • Should husbands and wives have different roles within the family? Why (not)?

Family or friends

  • Which are more important to you: your family or your friends?
  • What conflicts can arise between a person’s family and a person’s friends?

Family responsibilities

  • What responsibilities do parents have towards their children?
  • What responsibilities do children have towards their parents?

Shopping


Things to buy

  • What typical things can visitors to your country buy?
  • What things do young people like to buy in your country?

Money

  • Is it a good idea to save money? Why (not)?
  • Do you think that people are happier if they have money? Why (not)?

Shopping

  • What can shops do to make shopping more pleasant for their customers?
  • Do you think that in the future people will do most of their shopping using the Internet? Why?/ Why not?

Shopping at markets

  • Do people in your country enjoy going to open-air markets that sell things like food or clothes or old objects? Which type of market is more popular? Why?
  • Do you think markets are more suitable places for selling certain types of things? Which ones? Why do you think this is?
  • Do you think young people feel the same about shopping at markets as older people? Why is that?

Shopping in general

  • What do you think are the advantages of buying things from shops rather than markets?
  • How does advertising influence what people choose to buy? Is this true for everyone?
  • Do you think that any recent changes in the way people live have affected general shopping habits? Why is this?

Eating and food


Attitudes to food

  • What do you think a healthy diet consists of?
  • Which do people in your country prefer: traditional food or fast food such as hamburgers or pizzas?

Learning about food

  • Do you think children should be taught about healthy diets and cooking at school? Why (not)?
  • At what age do you think children should be taught to cook?

Food aid

  • What can be done to prevent poor people in the world going hungry?
  • Should rich countries help poor countries with more than just food?

Travelling


Travelling and learning

  • What do people learn from travelling?
  • Do you think the growth of international tourism is a good thing? Why (not)?

Tourism and culture

  • How has tourism changed the way people in your country live?
  • How should tourists behave when they visit your country?

Ways of travelling

  • What do you think is the best way for a tourist to travel if they want to learn about your country?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of travelling by plane?

Reasons for daily travel

  • Why do people need to travel every day?
  • What problems can people have when they are on their journey, for example to work or school? Why is this?
  • Some people say that daily journeys like these will not be so common in the future. Do you agree or disagree? Why?

Benefits of international travel

  • What do you think people can learn from travelling to other countries? Why?
  • Can travel make a positive difference to the economy of a country? How?
  • Do you think a society can benefit if its members have experience of travelling to other countries? In what ways?

School


Attitudes to education

  • How has education changed in your country in the last ten years?
  • Is a good education more important to a boy or a girl? Why?

The focus of education

  • How well do you think schools prepare young people for working life?
  • Do you think schools should teach subjects like art, music and dancing? Why (not)?

Education and technology

  • How important is it for schools to have computers for their students?
  • Is the Internet a valuable educational tool?

Adventure


Safety and danger

  • In what ways is life becoming safer, and in what ways is it becoming more dangerous?
  • Should people always avoid danger, or is it a good idea sometimes to take risks?

Taking risks

  • What risks should people try to avoid?
  • Do you think people take fewer risks as they grow older? Why (not)?

Adventure

  • How important is it to have adventure in our lives?
  • What do people learn about themselves from having adventures?

Newspapers


Attitudes to newspapers

  • In what ways are newspapers better for learning about the news than listening to the radio or watching television?
  • Do you think newspapers should be completely free to say whatever they want?

Tastes in reading

  • What do people enjoy reading in your country?
  • Do you think it is important for people to read a lot? Why (not)?

Public and private lives

  • What sort of stories do newspapers and magazines publish about well-known or famous people in your country?
  • Do you think the media should be allowed to publish stories about the private lives of public figures?

Sport & Health


  • What do you do to keep fit?
  • Are you good at sport?
  • What sports do you play?
  • What is the most popular sport in your country?
  • What are the best ways to keep fit?
  • Do you think most people consider exercise a chore or do they find it fun?
  • What is the most popular form of exercise in your country?
  • Do you think people in your country are less healthy than they used to be?
  • How can we encourage young people to stay healthy?
  • Should governments intervene to force people to be healthier?
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IELTS Speaking Tips – Part 2

IELTS tips

In the second section candidates are given a topic card and then have one minute to prepare after which they must speak about the given topic. The third section involves a discussion between the examiner and the candidate, generally on questions relating to the theme which they have already spoken about in part 2.

  • Beautiful places
  • Family
  • Shopping
  • Eating and food
  • Travelling
  • School
  • Adventure
  • Newspapers
  • Sport

Beautiful places


Take one minute to prepare a talk on the following subject.
Take notes if you like and remember to include reasons and examples.
You should then speak for between one and two minutes.

Describe a beautiful place to visit in your country.

You should say:

  • where it is
  • how to get there
  • what there is to do when you are there

and explain why you recommend this place.

Family


Take one minute to prepare a talk on the following subject.
Take notes if you like and remember to include reasons and examples.
You should then speak for between one and two minutes.

Describe the person in your family who you most admire.

You should say:

  • what their relationship is to you
  • what they have done in their life
  • what they do now

and explain why you admire them so much.

Shopping


Take one minute to prepare a talk on the following subject.
Take notes if you like and remember to include reasons and examples.
You should then speak for between one and two minutes.

Describe your favorite shop.

You should say:

  • where it is
  • what things it sells
  • what sort of people are its customers

and explain why you like the shop so much.

Take one minute to prepare a talk on the following subject.
Take notes if you like and remember to include reasons and examples.
You should then speak for between one and two minutes.

Describe an open-air or street market which you enjoyed visiting.

You should say:

  • where the market is
  • what the market sells
  • how big the market is

and explain why you enjoyed visiting this market.

Eating and food


Take one minute to prepare a talk on the following subject.
Take notes if you like and remember to include reasons and examples.
You should then speak for between one and two minutes.

Describe a special occasion when you had a really enjoyable meal.

You should say:

  • what the occasion was
  • who was at the meal
  • what you ate

and explain why the meal was so enjoyable.

Travelling


Travel is a verb: I enjoyed my travel trip very much. It is only used as a noun in a general sense, e.g. travel broadens the mind.

Trip refers to both a journey: the trip there was fine; or a short stay: a business trip; or a holiday: I’m going away on a trip.

Journey only refers to getting from one place to another: the journey there was very uncomfortable.

Take one minute to prepare a talk on the following subject.
Take notes if you like and remember to include reasons and examples.
You should then speak for between one and two minutes.

Describe a memorable journey you have made.

You should say:

  • where you were going
  • how you were travelling
  • why you were making the journey

and explain what made the journey so memorable.

Take one minute to prepare a talk on the following subject.
Take notes if you like and remember to include reasons and examples.
You should then speak for between one and two minutes.

Describe a journey that you remember well.

You should say:

  • where you went
  • how you travelled
  • why you went on the journey

and explain why you remember this journey well.

School


Take one minute to prepare a talk on the following subject.
Take notes if you like and remember to include reasons and examples.
You should then speak for between one and two minutes.

Describe a school which you went to.

You should say:

  • when you went there
  • how many people studied there
  • how long you spent there

and explain what you liked and disliked about it.

Adventure


Take one minute to prepare a talk on the following subject.
Take notes if you like and remember to include reasons and examples.
You should then speak for between one and two minutes.

Describe an exciting experience in your life.

You should say:

  • when the experience took place
  • where the experience took place
  • what happened exactly

and explain why the experience was so exciting.

Newspapers


Take one minute to prepare a talk on the following subject.
Take notes if you like and remember to include reasons and examples.
You should then speak for between one and two minutes.

Describe a newspaper or magazine you enjoy reading.

You should say:

  • what kind of newspaper or magazine it is, e.g. fashion
  • how often you buy it
  • what articles and information it contains

and explain why you enjoy reading it.

Sport


Take one minute to prepare a talk on the following subject.
Take notes if you like and remember to include reasons and examples.
You should then speak for between one and two minutes.

Describe an exciting competition or sporting event you have witnessed.

You should say:

  • what the competition or sporting event was
  • when and where it took place
  • who won

and explain why it was exciting.

 

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IELTS Speaking Tips – Part 1

IELTS tips

The questions in Part 1 are on general topics about your life. Your answers are from your life and experience. There is no right or wrong answer.

  • About you
  • Study
  • Work
  • Your town
  • Free time
  • Holidays
  • Places to go in your free time
  • Transport
  • Shopping
  • Your neighbourhood
  • Reading
  • Sports and games

About you


  • What is your (full) name?
  • Can I have your name please?
  • Could you tell me your full name please?
  • What shall I call you?
  • How can I address you?
  • Does your name have any special meaning?
  • Is your name important to you?
  • Do Korean people like changing their name? Why?
  • Have you ever changed your name? Why or why not?
  • Why do so many people change their name?
  • Do you work or study?

Study


  • What are you studying?
  • What’s your major?
  • Why did you choose that subject?
  • What do you find most interesting about your course?
  • What is your favorite subject?
  • What do you dislike about your study?
  • What do you hope to do after your graduation?
  • What are your ambitions for the future?
  • Do you hope to gain any qualifications?
  • What are the advantages of studying instead of working?

Work


  • Can you describe your job to me?
  • What do you do for a living?
  • How long have you been doing it?
  • Can you describe one of your typical working days?
  • What’s your daily routine on a working day?
  • Why did you choose to do that job?
  • What things do you enjoy about your work? Why?
  • What do you think is the attraction of your work?
  • What is your ideal job?
  • Do you want to change your current job? Why or why not?
  • Are you willing to keep your job permanently?
  • What are your plans for the future?

Your town


  • Can you describe your town or village to me?
  • Tell me something about your hometown.
  • Where are you from?
  • Where is your hometown?
  • Where do you come from?
  • What is the name of the street you live on?
  • What kind of street do you live on?
  • What do you like about your town?
  • What is the weather like in your town?
  • What building is considered famous in your town?
  • What jobs do people in your town do?
  • How has your town changed over the last twenty years?
  • What changes have taken place in your city in recent years?
  • Do you think it is better to live in the center of town or outside in the country? Why?

Free time


  • What do you enjoy doing in your free time?
  • How much time do you have each week for doing these things?
  • Why do you like doing these activities?
  • How did you start doing this activity at first?
  • Is there some other hobby or sport you would like to try? Why?
  • How has the way people spend their free time changed over the years?

Holidays


  • What do you do when you have a holiday?
  • Who do you usually spend holiday with?
  • Where do you like to spend your holidays? Why?
  • Can you describe a typical day in your holidays?
  • Why are holidays and important to you?
  • If you could take a holiday anywhere in the world, where would you go? Why?
  • What do people usually do during holidays and in your town?

Places to go in your free time


  • What do people do in your town in their free time?
  • Where can they go out for entertainment, or to enjoy themselves?
  • Which do you prefer: eating in restaurants or eating at home?
  • Which are the best places to eat out?

Transport


  • How did you come here today?
  • What is public transport like in your town?
  • How do you think it could be improved?
  • Do you think people should use public transport more? Why (not)?

Shopping


  • How much time do you spend shopping every week?
  • Do you enjoy going shopping? Why (not)?
  • What is your favourite shop and why do you like it?
  • What problems are there with shopping in your area?

Your neighbourhood


  • Can you describe the house where you live to me?
  • What is there to do in the area where you live?
  • What do you like about the area where you live?
  • How do you think it could be improved?
  • Do you think it is better to live in the centre of town or outside in the country? Why?

Reading


  • Do you enjoy reading? Why?
  • What sort of things do you read?
  • Tell me something about your favourite book.
  • What are the advantages of reading instead of watching television or going to the cinema?

Sports and games


  • What sports are most popular in your country?
  • What sports and games did you most enjoy playing
  • when you were a child?
  • Do people take as much exercise as in the past?
  • Why is exercise good for you?
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Which IELTS Books are the Best?

IELTS tips

Cambridge IELTS 11


IELTS

Cambridge IELTS 11 provides students with an excellent opportunity to familiarise themselves with IELTS and to practise examination techniques using authentic test material. You can choose an edition containing either four complete tests for Academic or for General Training module. An introduction to these different modules is included in each book, together with with an explanation of the scoring system used by Cambridge English Language Assessment. A comprehensive section of answers and tapescripts makes the material ideal for students working partly or entirely on their own.

Cambridge IELTS 10 Student’s Book with Answers


IELTS

Cambridge IELTS 10 provides students with an excellent opportunity to familiarise themselves with IELTS and to practise examination techniques using authentic test material prepared by Cambridge English Language Assessment. It contains four complete tests for Academic module candidates, plus extra Reading and Writing modules for General Training module candidates. An introduction to these different modules is included in each book, together with with an explanation of the scoring system used by Cambridge English Language Assessment. A comprehensive section of answers and tapescripts makes the material ideal for students working partly or entirely on their own.

Cambridge Grammar for IELTS Student’s Book with Answers and Audio CD


IELTS

Cambridge Grammar for IELTS provides complete coverage of the grammar needed for the IELTS test, and develops listening skills at the same time. It includes a wide range of IELTS tasks from the Academic and General Training Reading, Writing and Listening modules, and contains helpful grammar explanations and a grammar glossary. A Student’s Book ‘without answers’ is also available.

Cambridge Vocabulary for IELTS Advanced Band 6.5+ with Answers and Audio CD


IELTS

The book covers all the vocabulary needed by students aiming for band 6.5 and above in the IELTS tests and provides students with practice of exam tasks from each paper. Cambridge Vocabulary for IELTS Advanced focuses on moving students to 6.5 and beyond by working on vocabulary-building strategies necessary for success at advanced levels. It includes useful tips on how to approach IELTS exam tasks and covers especially tricky areas such as paraphrase and collocation. It is informed by the Cambridge English Corpus to ensure that the vocabulary is presented in genuine contexts and includes real learner errors. The Audio CD contains the listening and pronunciation exercises from each unit. The material is suitable for self-study or homework tasks, and may also be used in class with the teacher.

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IELTS Preparation tips which can help you…

IELTS tips

What are the key components of IELTS exam preparation? How should you prepare separate sections of IELTS to boost your overall score in the exam? How can you crack IELTS exam to enter different countries for your studies and work? Accepted over 140 countries worldwide, IELTS is one of the most popular English proficiency tests to study abroad. Divided into two versions- Academic and General, the test is a basic yardstick for admission to many universities globally. So, the big question is what does it take to crack IELTS? Before we bring you IELTS preparation tips, let us have a look at the exam pattern:

IELTS Test Component Duration Brief Description
Listening 30 minutes 4 sections, 40 items
Reading 60 minutes 3 sections, 40 items
Writing 60 minutes 2 tasks
Speaking 11-14 minutes 3 part one-on-one conversation

One of the interesting factors of IELTS preparation is that you can seamlessly incorporate your IELTS practice in your daily routine. Whether you are reading your favourite book, chatting with friends or even watching television, you can prepare for IELTS on the go!

Candidates can check IELTS pattern and IELTS preparation tips for all sections.

1. IELTS Preparation Tips – Listening Section

IELTS Listening pattern:

The Listening section is the most important part of the IELTS test. This section of IELTS has 4 sections and includes 40 items. In terms of IELTS preparation, it is best to take each section separately.

Here are the IELTS preparation tips for the Listening section:

  1. One-on-one interaction: As the name suggests, the one-on-one section is an interaction between two people. It could be a telephonic conversation or a general one and you will be asked to note down specific information from the conversation. The best way to prepare for this IELTS test is by listening to as many as conversations possible. A very easy way is to practice listening to English bulletins. One of the difficulties that a non-native English listener faces is to comprehend the fluency of native English speakers. However, this obstacle can be easily overcome with regular practice involving listening and noting it down on paper.
  2. Speech: In this section, the test-taker is made to listen to a speech. You listen to a speech in a social or academic context and answer a series of questions. The test will measure how well you can grasp the core idea of the speech and understand highlighted issues.
  3. Monologue: Similar to speech, this section involves a monologue. The best IELTS preparation tips to prepare for this is by mainly listening to discussions on television.
  4. Group discussion: This involves interaction between a maximum of four people. So, it is important that you make yourself comfortable catching up with more than one speech flow. Again, attending and listening to discussions are the best way to prepare for this test.

Some other IELTS preparation tips for listening section

  • In the listening IELTS section, make sure you read the first example at the beginning of the first section to acquaint yourself with the sound, the speaker and the situation.
  • Make sure you continue to listen to the audio while you write down the answers.
  • You have to practise listening to both an individual talking and more than one person speaking simultaneously.
  • Be smart with spellings, many lose easy marks because of spelling mistakes.
  • Practice short hand writing style, as it will save you lot of time. For instance, instead of writing approximately write approx.

2. IELTS Preparation Tips – Reading Section

This section evaluates your reading skills. Basically, you are given a long article to read which is followed by a set of questions like multiple choice, sentence completion, summary writing, matching information, short-answers. The reading section for both IELTS Academic and General test are different. Since, you are required to sit for the Academic test for the purpose of admission the content of the test is generally heavier and tougher.

Here are the IELTS preparation tips for the IELTS Reading test:

  1. Read as much as possible: This might seem tedious in the beginning. Therefore, the easier way to do that is by reading whatever is interesting to you in the beginning. It might be a short paragraph, an Ad, newspaper briefs. Once that phase is over, shift to heavier material like long essays, editorials, short stories.
  2. Make Notes: Always make notes while reading. This will sharpen your ability to look for details. Highlight and note down whatever seems important.
  3. Repeat the exercise: Do not stop after reading a note once. Sometimes it helps to go through the whole process of reading the text as it helps you to keep updated and remember what you had earlier taken note of. Also, you could find new vital points in the same text when you re-read it.
  4. Practice comprehension: Practicing comprehensions help a lot in the preparation process. Since the questions in the test are based on the style of comprehension, it always helps to sharpen your skills in comprehension.

Some other IELTS preparation tips for reading section

  • Read the entire passage carefully and take an overview of the crux of the passage.
  • Be careful of the time limits, you will not be given any extra seconds.
  • Do not leave any question unanswered even if you are not sure of the answer, as there is no negative marking.
  • To save few seconds, write the responses directly on sheets since you will not be given extra time to write it again.

3. IELTS Preparation Tips – Writing Section

The writing section in each version of IELTS has two sub sections. In the academic test, you are required to describe a chart, graph or diagram and in addition write an essay expressing your point of view or argument.

In the general test, the test-taker is presented with a situation and asked to write a letter explaining the situation along with the essay.

Here are the IELTS preparation tips for the IELTS writing test:

1. Read sample essays: It is always helpful to read as many sample essays as possible. Study the essays carefully and note down the points. There are few points to consider here:
Bring clarity on what is the essay about.

  1. Does the first paragraph make the topic clear?
  2. Does the headline reflect the subject of the essay?
  3. Observe how the writer flows the vital points of the essay.

2. Write essays: It is important to write sample essays as part of the preparation. Keep the following points in mind before writing the essay:

Note all the points that come to mind on the topic.

  1. Once that is done, filter the necessary points from the same list.
  2. Bring clarity on which direction you want your essay to take.
  3. While presenting an argument, it is important that you stick to your point. Never present more than one point of view in an argument. It will reflect confusion on the invigilator’s part.

3. Grammar practice: Practicing grammar will help you in making your essays and summaries free of any mistakes. Since it is an English level exam, grammar is one of the vital areas that will be checked. Hence, it is important that your articles are grammatically correct.

Some other IELTS Preparation tips for writing section
  • Begin with Task 2 first as it is worth more marks and is more easier.
  • Make sure you complete both the tasks on time. To get familiar with IELTS writing section time limits, it is necessary you practise writing.
  • Avoid informal language as much as you can, for instance, no abbreviations, no 1st or 2ndpronouns or possessive, apart from the concluding paragraph where you support your response.
  • Underline important words in the task to focus on what you have to do when you start answering. It works as a reminder.
  • Stick to the topic, do not write unnecesarry responses.

4. IELTS Preparation Tips – Speaking Section

One of the interesting sections of the IELTS test, the speaking section involves a one-on-one live interaction with an invigilator. This test analyses your use of spoken English, and takes between 11 and 14 minutes.

The speaking test requires you to be spontaneous as it is a human interaction as opposed to a computerized one. The test is divided into three parts.

First part: In the first part, the examiner asks some general questions to the test taker like his/her interests, what are you studying etc. Here are the tips to crack this section:

  1. Add value to your replies: It is good to be specific with your replies but you can always add some interesting facts in your answers. Eg: If you are asked where are you from? Besides answering the usual you can also add some detail about the place you are from.
  2. Be responsive: Do not take too long to answer questions. Be quick and responsive.

Second part: In this part, you are given a topic and asked to speak uninterrupted on the topic for at least 2 to 3 minutes. The examiner tests both your speaking skills and knowledge in this test.

  1. Think before you speak: It is best to take at least a minute before you start speaking. Bring clarity on the points you are going to make and most importantly how you are going to start.
  2. Knowledge: Make sure you have knowledge about what you are speaking. You should be able to communicate the key points of the topic to the invigilator.

Third part: This part is important as here the examiner asks you questions about the topic from the second part. He can put forward some arguments from your speech or he could ask you to elaborate on a specific point of view you have previously shared.

  1. Remember your arguments: Always remember your arguments from the previous test part. You should not look surprised or taken off guard when asked a question.
  2. Do not sound confused: Do not let your answer reflect confusion. Be confident and show your willingness.

Some other IELTS Preparation tips for Speaking

  • This is the section where you can enjoy speaking English, thus be confident and talk as fluently as you want.
  • You can do so by practising recording on a tape at home and listen to it. Focus on your mistakes and pronunciation.
  • Make sure you don’t go with prepared answer, as the examiner may spot it.
  • The best way to respond is to present your opinion, as that will help them assess your communication skills.
  • Remember there is no single answer and there is no right or wrong answer. However, make sure you present your idea.
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IELTS Listening

IELTS tips

IELTS tests a range of listening skills that you need to live, work or study in an English-speaking environment. This means that you need to be able to understand different types of spoken English in a range of formal and informal context.

Duration and format


Listening is the first module in the IELTS test. It has four sections of increasing difficulty, with a total of 40 questions, and takes about 30 minutes. Each section has 10 questions and is heard ONCE only. You have time to look through the questions before you listen, and also time to check your answers after each section. You write your answers on the question paper as you listen, and you then have 10 minutes at the end of the test to transfer your answers to a separate answer sheet. You will hear a range of accents including British, North American and Australian English.

Structure of the test


IELTS Listening Section 1 and 2

Section 1 and 2 develop the listening skills needed for survival in an English-speaking country, in situations such as shopping, accommodation, etc.
These listening passages include:

  • a conversation between two speakers talking about, for example, opening a bank account
  • a monologue about, for example, a tour of a museum or information on part-time English courses
IELTS Listening Section 3 and 4

Section 3 and 4 have a more academic context, with an educational or training focus.
These include:

  • a conversation between up to four people talking about, for example, a school project
  • a monologue, where, for example, a lecturer is talking on a general academic topic

Question types


A variety of questions are used, chosen from the following types:

  • Multiple choice
  • Matching
  • Classification
  • Short-answer questions and lists
  • Note/Table/Flow chart completion
  • Sentence or summary completion
  • Labelling a diagram, map or plan

Each section of the test usually contains two or three question types, so in one complete listening test you could get a maximum of 12 different question types (usually you will get about eight or nine). Sometimes the same question type occurs in more than one section of the test. Remember, you may get a mix of the listening question types in any section of the test.

Marking

All the answers have one mark. Any answer which is above the word limit specified for that task will not receive a mark, so it is important to read the instructions carefully. Spelling and grammar must be correct. Both British and American spelling are acceptable, e.g. programme/program, colour/color, but you should NOT use abbreviations. Numbers can be written as words or figures.

The final score is converted into a Band Score of between 1 and 9. You can get half bands in the listening test, e.g. 7.5.

How can I improve my Listening scores?

  • Use the time you have before the speaker begins, to look at the questions and try to predict what sorts of answers are required. (e.g. Do you need a number, date or a name?)
  • There is no negative marking so you should not leave blanks. Answer all the questions.
  • Try to anticipate what the speaker will say next. This will help you to focus on the answers.
  • Underline key words in the questions to help you when listening.
  • Don’t worry if you miss a question while the passage is going on. Answer the next and go back to the one you missed later.
  • Check your spelling and grammar carefully.
  • Be careful to transfer your answers accurately, in the time given at the end of the test to do this.

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